seec: State Grants and State Loans

State Grants and Loans
 
Questions - Grants and Loans
1.
 
Are there any exceptions to the definition of ‘State Contract” as it applies to state grants and state loans?
2.
 
 
My non-profit entity received a grant of state funds valued over $50,000 from a library consortium.  Is my entity a state contractor?
3.
 
Is a municipal library that receives a one-time grant of $60,000 directly from the state considered a state contractor?
4.
 
 
 
 
My non-profit entity works in the community to facilitate home ownership in low-income neighborhoods in Connecticut.  We receive loan funds directly form a Connecticut state agency or quasi-public agency (QPA) and lend that money to others.  Is my entity a state contractor?
5.
 
 
 
My non-profit entity receives over $100,000 in state funds in a calendar year as a combination of loans and grants from a municipal housing authority to rehabilitate housing, and so on.  Is my group a state contractor?
6.
 
 
Is a municipal housing authority which receives over $100,000 loans and grants from state and quasi-public agencies in a calendar year a state contractor?
7.
 
 
My family will receive grants valued over $50,000 from Connecticut social service agencies to meet the needs of disabled children in the family.  Are we state contractors?
8.
 
 
Is a student receiving education loans valued at over $50,000 from Connecticut state college or a quasi-public agency a state contractor?
9.
 
Is a mortgage loan from a state or quasi-public agency to an individual to purchase a house a state contractor?
10.
 
 
If my company or non-profit entity has a contract, or loan with, or grant from a pending bid/proposal/quotation with any judicial branch agency, are my principals covered by the ban?
11.
 
 
If my company or non-profit entity has small contracts with both the executive and legislative branch agencies, is my company a state contractor?
 
 

Questions - State Grants and Loans
 
1. Are there any exceptions to the definition of a “state contract” as it applies to state grants and state loans?
 
Public Act 07-1 further refines the definition of a “state contract” by EXCLUDING any agreement with the state, any state agency or any quasi-public agency that is exclusively federally funded, an education loan or a loan to an individual for other than commercial purposes.
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2. My non-profit entity received a grant of state funds valued over $50,000 from a library consortium.  Is my entity a state contractor?

No.  The library consortium is the state contractor.  Only an entity with direct relationship to the state is a state contractor.

 
3. Is a municipal library that receives a one-time grant of $60,000 directly form the state considered a state contractor?
 
No, if the library is an agency or department of the municipal government.  The law specifically excludes municipalities from the definition of state contractor.  An independent non-profit library that is governed by a Board of Directors or Trustees and not by the municipality would be a state contractor.

 
4. My non-profit entity works in the community to facilitate home ownership in low-income neighborhoods in Connecticut.  We receive loan funds directly from a Connecticut state agency or quasi-public agency (QPA) and lend that money to others.  Is my entity a state contractor?
 
Yes, if the funds are state funds and the loan meets the statutory financial threshold of $50,000 or above for a single contract or $100,000 in the aggregate.  No, if the loans are exclusively federal funded and the quasi-public agency merely administers the funds.

 
5. My non-profit entity receives over $100,000 in state funds in a calendar year as a combination of loans and grants from a municipal housing authority to rehabilitate housing, and so on.  Is my group a state contractor?

No, because the non-profit did not receive funds directly from the state.  The answer would be yes if the funds were from a state or quasi-public agency, unless exclusively federally funded.

 
6. Is a municipal housing authority, which receives over $100,000 in loans and grants from state and quasi-public agencies in a calendar year a state contractor?

No.  The law specifically excludes municipalities from the definition of state contractor.  However, if the entity is not an agency or department of municipal government, then it would be a state contractor under these circumstances and its principals would be covered by the contribution and /solicitation prohibition.

 
7. My family will receive grants valued over $50,000 from Connecticut social service agencies to meet the needs of disabled children in the family.  Are we state contractors?

No, individual or family recipients of state social services aid such as SAGA, TANF, Section 8 vouchers, Title 19 assistance, grants via the Connecticut Department of Veterans Affairs, and similar programs, are not considered state contractors.

  
8. Is a student receiving education loans valued at over $50,000 from a Connecticut state college or a quasi-public agency a state contractor?

No.  Individual recipients of student loans and other loans, as a service to individuals in Connecticut, such as certain home mortgage loans and guarantees to homeowners or families, are not state contractors.

 
9. Is a mortgage loan from a state or quasi-public agency to an individual to purchase a house a state contract?

No.  Individual or family recipients of loans to purchase a residence are not state contractors.

 
10. If my company or non-profit entity has a contract, loan or grant from a pending bid, proposal or quotation with any judicial branch agency, are my principals covered by the ban?

No, judicial branch agencies are not covered by this law.

 
11. If my company or non-profit entity has small contracts with both the executive and legislative branch agencies, is my company a state contractor?

If your company has small contracts with both the executive and legislative branches of government, but the contracts with neither branch exceed $50,000 or $100,000 in the aggregate your company is not a state contractor with either branch.  In other words, contracts are not aggregated between the separate branches for purposes of determining the liabilities of the ban.

 
 
 




Content Last Modified on 1/29/2009 9:37:57 AM