OHA: More About HMOs

More About HMOs

HMOs are the oldest form of a managed care. There are many fewer HMOs today than there were even ten years ago.  There are different kinds of HMOs. If doctors are employees of the health plan and you visit them at central medical offices or clinics, it is a staff or group model HMO. Other HMOs contract with physician groups or individual doctors who have private offices. These are called individual practice associations (IPAs) or networks.

HMOs will give you a list of doctors from which to choose a primary care doctor. This doctor coordinates your care, which means that generally you must contact him or her to be referred to a specialist. {HMO}

With some HMOs, you will pay nothing when you visit doctors. With other HMOs there may be a co-payment, such as $15 or $25, for various services. If you belong to an HMO, the plan only covers the cost of charges for doctors in that HMO. If you go outside the HMO, you are obligated to pay the bill.

Because HMOs receive a fixed fee for your covered medical care, it is in their interest to make sure you get basic health care for problems before they become serious. HMOs typically provide preventive care, such as office visits, immunizations, well-baby checkups, mammograms, and physicals. The range of services covered varies in HMOs, so it is important to compare available plans. Some services, such as outpatient mental health care, often are provided only on a limited basis, although state law prohibits fully-funded HMOs from placing undue restrictions on access to mental health care.

Many people like HMOs because they do not require claim forms for office visits or hospital stays. Instead, members present a card, like a credit card, at the doctor's office or hospital.

In almost all HMOs, you choose one doctor to serve as your primary care doctor. This doctor monitors your health and provides most of your medical care, referring you to specialists and other health care professionals as needed. You usually cannot see a specialist without a referral from your primary care doctor who is expected to manage the care you receive. This is one way that HMOs can limit your choice.



Content Last Modified on 6/9/2010 11:26:48 AM