oec: CT ELDS - Standards by Domain
Connecticut Office of Early Childhood
oec: CT ELDS - Standards by Domain

CT ELDS - Standards by Domain

 
Click the links below to access the standards for each domain:
 
Cognition (pages 22-25)
 
 
 
Language and Literacy (pages 35-40)
 
Creative Arts (pages 41-43)
 
Mathematics (pages 44-46)
 
Science (pages 47-49)
 
Social Studies (pages 50-51)
 
 
 
 

 

Cognition

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop effective approaches to learning.

Curiosity and

Initiative

C.6.1 Use

senses to explore immediate environment

C.12.1 Seek familiar people and/or objects that are not there

C.18.1  Use senses to actively investigate and explore the effects of new actions on objects

C.24.1 Explore objects, activities and environments

C.36.1 Ask questions

and seek answers from a variety of sources

C.48.1 Explore and investigate a variety of experiences and topics using different materials

C.60.1 Investigate ways to make something happen

Engagement with Environment, People and Objects

C.6.2 Orient to source of sound or movement and vocalize in

response to sights and sounds in

the immediate environment

C.12.2 Show interest in a wider variety of sights and sounds with greater purpose, often in shared experiences with adults

C.18.2 Focus attention on interesting sights

or sounds, often in shared experiences with adults

C.24.2 Engage in interactions and self-selected activities for

increasing lengths of time

C.36.2 Maintain interest in self-selected activities and may seek to engage others or ask questions

C.48.2 Maintain interest in exploring specific topics over time

C.60.2 Express interest in learning about a specific topic over time

C.60.3 Engage in preferred and some non-preferred activities for longer periods of time. Remain with some high interest activities 15 minutes or longer

Eagerness to

Learn

C.6.3 Laugh, babble, increase movement,

and engage in repetition of a learning activity

C.12.3 Seek out new materials and experiences

C.18.3 Explore new ways to use objects and observe results

C.24.3 Demonstrate a desire to accomplish a new skill. May look to others for approval and congratulations

C.36.3 Demonstrate enthusiasm for new learning (may be within familiar contexts)

C.48.3 Seek out new challenges and novel experiences

C.60.4 Show pride in accomplishment when reaching mastery of a skill and share experiences with others

Cooperation with Peers

in Learning

Experiences

 

 

 

 

 

C.48.4 Engage in and complete learning activities with peers

C.60.5 Plan and complete learning activity with a peer

C.48.5 Help and cooperate in group

C.60.6 Model or teach peers how to use materials or complete a task

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to use logic and reasoning.

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Cause and

Effect

C.6.4 Show interest in the results of their actions and “accidental” discoveries

C.12.4 Recognize effect of actions

on object - cause and effect  (e.g., shake a rattle and it makes a sound)

C.18.4 Learn

by observing or listening to others and repeating their actions or verbalizations

C.24.4 Repeat actions over and over and notice results

C.36.4 Vary actions to observe different results (e.g., hit lever harder to see if result changes)

C.48.6 Manipulate materials and communicate about the impact of own actions

C.60.7 Try multiple uses of same materials and observe differing results

Attributes, Sorting and Patterns

C.6.5  Recognize familiar people

or objects in the immediate environment (e.g., notice differences between various people and objects)

C.12.5 Respond to new or

novel objects with interest, recognizing differences

C.18.5 Match objects that are the same (simple categorizing)

C.24.5 Sort objects by type (e.g., cars and blocks) and put some objects in order (e.g., lines up three objects from smallest to biggest)

C.36.5 Identify differences between objects across multiple characteristics (e.g., texture, color,

shape, size)

C.48.7 Identify similarities and differences in objects, people, events, sounds based on one attribute (e.g., same

or different colors, loud or soft sound)

C.60.8 Compare relative attributes of objects, people, events, sounds (e.g.,

louder, more, less)

C.48.8 Recognize patterns in routines, objects and/or sounds and replicate sequence using objects or language

C.60.9 Use familiar patterns to solve problems and reason (e.g., if we go to the library every other day and we went yesterday, today

we will...)

C.60.10 Begin to question accuracy of information and sources as evidenced by sharing conflicting information from another source (e.g., when the

teacher shares information with class, says, “But my dad says…”)

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to use logic and reasoning (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Problem

Solving

C.6.6 Sometimes will show they

can solve problems by reaching for desired toys or blanket

C.12.6 Use a variety of actions to obtain desired objects

C.18.6

Purposefully experiment with the effects of

new actions upon objects

C.24.6 Try a successful strategy in a new situation (e.g., tugging or prying on something that is stuck)

C.36.6 Use objects in new and unexpected ways to solve problems through trial and error

C.48.9 Think of and try an alternative strategy when a

first attempt at solving a problem is unsuccessful

C.60.11 Try multiple strategies to solve a problem and draw on multiple resources (e.g., look at what a peer is doing for ideas)

C.12.7 Solve

simple manipulative challenges through observation and imitation (e.g., putting something “into a bucket”)

C.18.7 Utilize shapes and sorting boxes. May use trial and error to fit objects together

C.24.7 Take things apart and try to put them back together

C.36.7 Use spatial relationships to solve problems  (e.g., fit pieces into puzzle)

Symbolic

Representation

 

 

C.18.8 Use

dolls and stuffed animals as if they were real (e.g., rocks doll, pets stuffed dog)

C.24.8 Play with dolls or stuffed animals and realistic props together (e.g., use a play spoon to feed a doll)

C.36.8 Use a similar object to represent another object in play (e.g., pretend a pencil is a spoon)

C.48.10 Use or make a prop to represent

an object (e.g., build a telephone)

C.60.12 Use dissimilar objects to represent other objects in play or perform an action with an imaginary object (e.g., use stirring action without anything in hand)

C.18.9 Engage in pretend play with realistic objects (e.g., uses a play phone to pretend to make a phone call)

C.24.9 Act out familiar functions in play (e.g., sweeping floor, pouring milk)

C.36.9 Act out relational roles in play (e.g., mom or dad with baby)

C.48.11 Act out actions or scenarios involving familiar roles (e.g., teacher, doctor, firefighter)

C.60.13 Engage in extended pretend play scenarios and display recognition of the difference between pretend or fantasy situations and reality

C.48.12 Represent people, places

or things through simple drawings, movements and three-dimensional construction

C.60.14 Represent people, places or things through drawings, movements and/or three-dimensional constructions that are increasingly abstract (e.g., may draw a map that includes an “X” that marks the location of the treasure)

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to strengthen executive  function.

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Choosing and

Planning

 

C.12.8 Indicate preferences nonverbally

C.18.10 Indicate preferences by pointing and using one or two words

C.24.10 Indicate preferences using simple language

C.36.10 Make choices based on preferences

C.48.13 With adult assistance, choose activities and plan what to do

C.60.15 Make a plan, follow through and review plan based on what they actually did. Indicate reasons for choice, set goals and follow plan

Task

Persistence

C.6.7 Repeat actions to obtain similar results

C.12.9 Practice an activity many times until successful

C.18.11 Complete simple activities

C.24.11 Complete simple activities despite frustration

C.36.11 Complete self- selected short-term activities many times to gain mastery

C.48.14 Continue working through moderately difficult activities, despite some frustration

C.60.16 Complete longer term and more complex tasks with a focus on the goal, despite frustration

Cognitive

Flexibility

 

 

C.18.12 Use objects in new and unexpected ways

C.24.12 Purposefully try multiple ways of using the same objects

C.36.12 Realize when something is not working and with adult assistance can try another approach

C.48.15 With adult assistance, stop and consider alternatives when encountering a problem

C.60.17 Generate or seek out multiple solutions to a problem

Working

Memory

 

 

 

C.24.13  Hold in mind a simple task long enough to complete it (e.g., wiping a table, walking across the room to throw something in the garbage)

C.36.13 Remember where recently used objects were placed

C.48.16 Engage in games that involve remembering (e.g., memory)

LR.60.18 Hold in mind the topic of group discussion and contribute personal experience (e.g., when

talking about something that is broken says, “My mom used a screwdriver to fix our shelf.”)

Regulation of Attention and Impulses

 

 

 

C.24.14  Engage in interactions and self-selected activities for increasing

length of time

C.36.14  Maintain focus on high-interest activities in the face of routine distractions

C.48.17  Maintain focus on high-interest activities in the face

of minor social or sensory distractions

C.60.19 Engage in preferred and some non-preferred activities for longer periods

of time. Remain with some high-interest activities 15 minutes or longer

C.36.15  With adult support, resist impulses in structured settings

for brief, but increasing periods of time

C.48.18  With adult reminders can briefly inhibit initial response (e.g., stop imitating inappropriate behaviors of peers, wait turn to respond

to question or prompt in group setting)

C.60.20 Typically resists impulses and can wait longer to respond in more structured settings (e.g., at

a restaurant, in circle time in preschool)

 
 
 

 

Social and Emotional Development

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop trusting healthy attachments and relationships with primary caregivers.

Trusting

Relationships

SE.6.1 Attend and respond to familiar adults and are able to be soothed when distressed

SE.12.1

Prefer primary caregiver(s)

to others and usually accept guidance from

trusted adults

SE.18.1 Look to trusted caregivers for cues about how to respond to their environment for comfort and support

SE.24.1 Use familiar adults as secure base through behaviors such as glancing back at caregiver while playing

SE.36.1 Approach caregivers for support and

comfort, particularly during stressful or frustrating situations

SE.48.1 Engage in interactions with less familiar adults

SE.60.1 Seek help and approval from a wider array of adults in trusted roles

Managing

Separation

SE.6.2 Show recognition of familiar faces and awareness if someone is a stranger

SE.12.2 Display preference

for trusted adults which may include exhibiting fear

and protesting at separation

SE.18.2 Display attachment to trusted adults and feelings

of security which

may include a fear of strangers and new and unfamiliar places

SE.24.2 Manage

routine separations from caregivers with little distress and calm quickly after a separation

SE.36.2 Manage most separations without distress and adjust to new

settings with support from a trusted adult

SE.48.2 Manage most separations without distress and adjust

to new settings in the presence of trusted adult

SE.60.2 Through expanding relationships with adults (e.g., teacher, play group leader, friends’ caregivers), exhibit comfort in exploring more new settings, although they

may need to periodically check-in with a familiar adult

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop self-regulation.

Regulation of Emotions and Behavior

SE.6.3 In addition to being comforted by familiar adult,

can also get comfort from sucking thumb, fist, or pacifier

SE.12.3 Have ways to comfort self, which may involve items such as a stuffed animal or a special blanket that help them feel safe and secure

SE.18.3 Show increasing regulation through daily routines, activities and familiar adults

SE.24.3 With adult assistance, find comfort in rituals and routines. May use special comfort object to self-soothe (especially at nap time)

SE.36.3 With adult support, use self- soothing techniques to calm

SE.48.3 Use strategies to self-soothe with limited adult support

SE.60.3 Use strategies to self-soothe across situations with minimal prompting and share strategies with peers or family

SE 60.4 Demonstrate increased ability to consider the social standards of

the environment when responding to their emotional state

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop self-regulation (continued)

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Regulation of Impulses and Behavior

SE.6.4 Respond to having needs met (e.g., is comforted by being picked up or fed)

SE.12.4

Respond to adult interactions, including tone of voice, expression and gestures (e.g., shaking head and frowning)

SE.18.4 Respond to adult guidance to accept an

alternative to initial desire or impulse (e.g., a truck from the shelf vs. one another child has, food choices)

SE. 24.4 Accept some redirection from adults

SE.36.4 Begin to control behavior by responding to choice and limits provided by an adult

SE.48.4 With adult guidance and support, wait for short period of time to get something wanted (e.g., waiting for turn with a toy or waiting for next step in daily routine)

SE.60.5 Tolerate small levels of frustration and disappointment, displaying appropriate behavior with adult prompting and support

SE.12.5 Show anticipation

and respond to familiar routines in their lives

SE.18.5 Within the context of a responsive adult relationship, will begin to tolerate a brief wait for needs to be met

SE.24.5 Is aware of typical routine and shows some

understanding of rules, but may need adult support

SE.36.5 Make transitions and follow basic routines and rules with adult supervision

SE.48.5 Make transitions and follow basic schedule, routines and rules with occasional reminders

SE.60.6 Initiate previously taught strategies to help delay gratification (e.g., sets up turn-taking with a peer, finds a book to read while waiting for a special activity)

SE.18.6 Show anticipation of next step in daily routine (e.g., reaches or signs for bib when placed in high chair)

SE.60.7 Recall and follow daily routines with little support, including adapting to changes in rules and routines

Strand D: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop, express, recognize  and respond  to emotions.

Emotional

Expression

SE.6.5 Display varied responses (e.g., will smile or kick when a caregiver interacts with them. May stiffen when something displeases them,

or may turn away from something they dislike)

SE.12.6 Express basic emotions (e.g., sadness, frustration,

anger) through facial expressions, movements, crying, smiling, laughing

SE.18.7 Express emotions through physical means such as hugging, throwing. May be cooperative or uncooperative and look to adult for reaction

SE.24.6 Express more complex emotions (e.g., excitement, embarrassment, pride, sadness) and begin to communicate feelings (although this remains an emerging skill

which is only partially effective)

SE.36.6 Begin to communicate about feelings, including the cause and reaction to these feelings (e.g.,  “I miss my mommy. I sad,” “He mad you took his toy.” “I sad so Papa hug me.”)

SE.48.6 Express emotions experienced in typical daily routines (e.g., frustration at waiting, excitement about a favored

activity, pride) through language and gesturing rather than physical ways

SE.60.8 Describe emotions and feelings to trusted adults and peers

Strand E: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop, express, recognize  and respond  to emotions (cotinued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Recognition and Response to Emotions in Others

SE.6.6 React to different emotions of familiar adults

(e.g., smile and coo at smiling faces,

turn away from sad faces)

SE.12.7 Notice and react to feelings of others. (e.g., may frown when another baby

is crying or be upset if hears yelling)

SE.18.8 Recognize basic feelings in self and others

SE.24.7 Recognize and respond to basic feelings in others (e.g., gives item to peer who is upset)

SE.36.7 Label a variety of emotions in pictures and others’ expressions

SE.48.7 Recognize, label and respond to a wide variety of emotions in others

SE.60.9 Recognize and show acknowledgement

of the feelings, needs and rights of others through behavior (e.g., say “thank you,” share with others, notice issues of fairness)

SE.18.9 Begin to respond to others’ feelings and show interest in them. Show awareness

of when an adult is pleased or upset with behavior

SE 36.8 Show

awareness of appropriate responses to the emotional state of others (e.g., may occasionally comfort someone who is upset or may nurture a doll during dramatic play)

SE.48.8 Make connections

between emotional

reaction of others and own emotional experiences

SE.60.10 Begin to

understand that different people may have different emotional reactions

Strand F: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop self-awareness, self-concept and competence.

Sense of self

SE.6.7 React when hearing their own name through movement or expressions

SE.12.8

Consistently respond to their name

SE.18.10

Demonstrates self- awareness though response to name and use of “me” and “mine”

SE.24.8 Identify own family members by relationship and/or name

SE.36.9 Identify self, family members, teacher and some peers by name

SE.48.9 Refer to themselves by first and last name and identify

some characteristics (e.g., gender, hair color, etc.) and skills

SE.60.11 Identify themselves as an individual and a part of a group

by sharing individual characteristics and roles within the group (e.g., name family members and roles, name team members or classmates)

SE.6.8 Begin to realize their hands and feet belong to them and explore them as well as face, eyes and mouth

SE.12.9 Show awareness of body parts of self and others

SE.18.11 Recognize self in mirror

Personal

Preferences

SE 6.9 Express preferences for familiar people and some objects. (e.g., stop crying more quickly with a familiar person; move their legs, arms and smile at a familiar person)

SE.12.10

Develop preferences for food, objects, textures.  May reject non- preferred items (e.g., pushing them away)

SE.18.12 Begin to communicate own likes and dislikes

SE.24.9 Use words and/or gestures to express interests (e.g., points and says, “Look, airplane.”)

SE.36.10 May want to keep what belongs to them close by and often will not want to share

SE.48.10  Recognize and describe themselves in terms of basic preferences

SE.60.12  Describe self by referring to preferences, thoughts and feelings

Strand G: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop self-awareness, self-concept and competence (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Self-

Concept and

Competency

 

SE.12.11

Demonstrate anticipation of results from own actions (e.g., drops toy so adult will pick it up,

repeats action that makes loud noise)

SE.18.13 Show confidence when supported to complete familiar tasks and will attempt new tasks with adult support

SE.24.10

Complete simple familiar tasks with confidence (e.g., puts on article of clothing). Engage

in new experiences with support from a familiar adult

SE.36.11 Regularly engage in familiar tasks. Begin to show independence by

frequently attempting to do things on their own even when tasks are difficult for them

SE.48.11 Demonstrate confidence in a range of activities, routines and tasks and take initiative in attempting unfamiliar tasks

SE.60.13 Demonstrate increased confidence and a willingness to take risks

when attempting new tasks and making decisions regarding activities and materials

SE.12.12

Respond to own actions with pleasure (e.g., coos, laughs)

SE.18.14 React positively (e.g., smiles, claps) to accomplishments

SE. 36.12 Express feeling of pleasure over accomplishment and share this with others (e.g., “Look what I made.”)

SE.60.14 Show pride in accomplishments and abilities

Strand H: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop social relationships.

Adult Relationships (see note below)

SE.6.10 Respond differently to different people. Respond to familiar people by smiling, cooing and moving their body

SE.12.13

Engage in social interactions not connected to getting physical needs met (e.g., peek-a-boo, performing, copying others and babbling)

SE.18.15 Show affection or shared attention (e.g., pointing out something

of interest) to an increasing number of familiar people

SE.24.11 Enjoy games and other social exchanges with familiar adults. May seek out repeated patterns

of interaction

SE.36.13 Enjoy sharing new experiences with familiar adults

SE.48.12 Communicate with familiar adults and accept or request guidance

SE.60.15 Typically use socially appropriate behavior with adults, such as helping, responding to limits, etc.

SE.6.11 Show interest in interacting with others. May

gain an adults attention and wait for a response

SE.12.14 Notice the activity of adults and other children and attend closely

 

Note:  Caregivers guide children during interactions with them, as well as other adults. Therefore, these markers of social relationships with adults are highly dependent upon child temperament, the adult temperament and the adults guidance and regulation of the interplay.

 

 

Strand H: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop social relationships (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Play/ Friendship

SE.6.12 Notice other children and may touch, smile or coo to them

SE.12.15 Watch actions of other children but

does not join the play. May stay in proximity, make eye contact and babble

SE.18.16 Show interest in children who are playing nearby and may interact with them briefly

SE.24.12 Show interest in what other children are doing and play

alongside them with similar materials

SE.36.14 Seek out other children and

will interact with other children using common materials

SE.48.13 Interact with one or more children (including small groups) beginning to work together to build or complete a project

SE.60.16 Cooperate with peers through sharing and taking turns

SE.36.15 Show preference for certain peers over time although these

preferences may shift

SE.60.17  Show increasing investment in the responses and friendship of peers and modify behavior to enhance peer relationships

SE.48.14 Interact with a variety of children in the program

SE.60.18 Seek help from peers and offer assistance when it is appropriate

Conflict

Resolution

 

 

 

 

 

SE.48.15 Seek and accept adult help to solve conflicts with peers

SE.60.19 Engage in developing solutions and work to resolve conflict with peers

 
 

 

Physical Development and Health

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop gross motor skills.

Mobility

 

 

*Children may use adaptive equipment or an assistive device to achieve independence on these indicators

PH.6.1 Show head control when in any position

and during transitional movement

PH.12.1 Get into sitting position

on own and

play while in this position

PH.18.1 Use walking as main means of mobility and pull toy when walking

PH.24.1 Walk with legs closer together and able to change directions smoothly and carry objects

PH.36.1 Walk and run on various surfaces and level changes with balance and control of speed

PH.48.1 Walk up and down stairs alternating feet while carrying an object

PH.60.1 Alternate direction while running and stop easily without losing balance

PH.6.2 Roll over, usually from both directions

PH.12.2 Move when on the floor by rolling,

creeping, crawling with purpose

PH.18.2 Stand from a squat position using arms to push off floor

PH.24.2 Begin to run

PH.6.3 Reach, grasp and bat for objects overhead and eventually reach and play with feet when on back

PH.36.2 Walk up and down stairs alternating feet on steps with railing held

PH.6.4 Push up and support weight on forearms when on stomach

PH.12.3 Pull to stand, cruise

along furniture and stand alone. May take a few steps independently or with help

PH.18.3 Creep up and down stairs

PH.24.3   Walk up and down steps holding onto rail, often leading with the same foot and negotiating one step at

a time

PH.6.5 Sit with support

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop gross motor skills  (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Large Muscle Movement and Coordination

 

 

PH.18.4 Throw ball in forward direction

PH.24.4 Use more complicated series of movements such as climbing onto and down from furniture without help, propelling self on ride-on toys

PH.36.3 Catch and throw a playground

ball with an adult short distance away

PH.48.2 Combine several gross motor skills in an organized way, such as moving through an obstacle course or participating in a creative movement activity following directives

PH.60.2 Coordinate more complex movements with increasing control, balance, and accuracy (e.g., climbing on playground equipment, pumping a swing, bending, twisting, playing hopscotch, riding tricycle)

PH.36.4 Jump with two feet

PH.48.3 Hop on one foot

PH.24.5 Catch a large ball tossed from a short distance against their body using

both arms

PH.36.5 Kick a ball in forward direction

PH.48.4 Kick ball at target a short distance away with accuracy and speed

PH.48.5 Throw small

ball overhand at target a short distance away with accuracy

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop fine motor skills.

Visual Motor

Integration

PH.6.6 Locate an object using vision or sound, reach and grasp the object

PH.12.4 Reach into containers or reach to activate a simple cause and effect toy

PH.18.5 Engage in play that requires using vision and hands such as building a tower or structure, with several

blocks balanced on top of each other or placing a large peg in a pegboard base

PH.24.6 Orient pieces to match opening and complete a simple inset form board/puzzle or shape sorter

PH.36.6 Use common tools that require eye- hand coordination

with precision and for their intended purpose (e.g., hammer peg, twist handle to open latch, put body parts

on Mr. Potato)

PH.48.6 Use smaller objects with precision (e.g., put small pegs in light board, use large needle to sew, use scissors to cut on curved line, etc.)

PH.60.3 Use coordinated movements to manipulate materials, including cutting and drawing with control and using appropriate hand position to manipulate objects

(e.g., thumb up position while using scissors)

PH.6.7 Follow an object with eyes across body, crossing the middle

PH.12.5 Combine and separate toys (e.g., replace and remove large rings from post in any order)

 

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to develop fine motor skills  (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Small Muscle Movement and Coordination

PH.6.8 Use voluntary and purposeful movements to bring hands to mouth

PH.12.6 Move objects from one hand to another and combine items at center of body (e.g., banging two blocks together)

PH.18.6 Use both hands at the same time for different purposes (e.g., may stabilize

tower with one hand and add an additional block with other hand)

PH.24.7 Use a writing tool to scribble purposefully and imitate vertical and

horizontal stroke. May use a

fisted grasp

PH.36.7 Use writing tools or paint objects with some control and purpose

PH.48.7 Use writing/ drawing tools with increased precision to draw simple shapes, pictures and/or letter. May have immature pencil grasp with 3-5 fingers on pencil shaft

PH.60.4 Have sufficient control of writing implements to copy simple forms or geometric shapes and write some letters (e.g., may write own name since these are most familiar)

PH.6.9 Bring hands together while lying on back

PH.12.7 Use index finger to poke and point and grasp small objects between thumb

and fingertips

PH.60.5 Use a mature pencil grasp with 3 fingers on writing implement

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to acquire adaptive skills.

Note: Consideration of cultural beliefs and preferences across these developmental progressions is critical.

Feeding Routines/ Nutrition

PH.6.10 Participate in feeding routines with consistent caregivers by holding onto bottle, and/or leaning forward in anticipation of food

offered via bottle, breast or spoon

PH.12.8

Participate in feeding routines by holding cups or bottles, using fingers for self- feeding and/

or using eating utensils

PH.18.7

Demonstrate increased proficiency using eating utensils and cups. May begin

to serve self some food, but spills are common

PH.24.8 Begin to serve self food (dishing out helpings and pouring liquids) with adult assistance

PH.36.8 Feed self with minimal spilling

PH.48.8 Pour liquid from a small pitcher

PH.60.6 Use butter knife to spread and cut. Open most containers to remove food

Safety and

Responsibility

 

 

PH.18.8 Typically respond to adult requests to stop unsafe behavior

PH. 24.9 Show awareness of items that are unsafe and point them out to familiar adults (e.g., point out open gate above stairs, show them a knife that is left on counter)

PH.36.9 Tell several basic safety rules

at home and in familiar settings (e.g., school, library and playground).

Bring other childrens rule-breaking to the attention of adults

PH.48.9 Understand basic safety rules at home and in familiar settings (e.g., school, library and playground). Generally follow

rules and bring other childrens rule-breaking to the attention of adults

PH.60.7 Understand the reason for most basic safety rules at home, in familiar settings and in the community

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to acquire adaptive skills  (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Dressing and

Hygiene

 

PH.12.9 Participate in dressing, undressing and bathing by holding arms out, taking off socks, etc.

PH.18.9 Show interest in doing things for self including dressing. Put arm in sleeve, step out of pants, attempt to put on socks or shoes

PH.24.10 Engage in dressing and hygiene routines with increasing intention:  pull pants up and down, take off jacket, dry own hands

PH.36.10 Attempt to complete basic self- care routines (e.g., dressing, undressing, toileting and washing) although may still need caregiver assistance

PH.48.10 Manage most aspects of dressing, toileting, hand washing and tooth brushing independently with minimal caregiver reminders to guide and support

PH.60.8 Typically manage own dressing, toileting and basic hygiene

Strand D: Early learning  experiences will support children to maintain  physical health status and well-being.

Note: Consideration of cultural beliefs and preferences across these developmental progressions is critical.

Physical

Health Status

Childrens physical health status impacts learning and development in all areas. Children who possess good overall health (including oral, visual and auditory) with any appropriate supports (such as glasses, hearing aids, or alternative communication systems) have a solid foundation to help them grow and learn. Maintaining good overall health status involves regular screenings, a lack of illness or preventable diseases, age appropriate amounts of sleep and rest and healthy growth patterns (e.g., height and weight).

Physical

Activity

PH.6.11 Interact with caregivers in daily physical activities that involve varying positions

and promote development of movement skills

PH.12.10 Interact with caregivers in daily physical activities that involve exploration and movement

PH.18.10 Interact with caregivers in a variety of physical activity experiences

PH.24.11 Engage in physical activity in both indoor and outdoor environments that require use of large muscles

PH.36.11

Demonstrate increasing strength and endurance sufficient to actively engage in a total of

60 minutes of physical activity spread over

the course of a day

PH.48.11 Demonstrate increasing strength and endurance sufficient to actively engage in 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity spread over the course

of a day

PH.60.9 Demonstrate increasing strength and endurance sufficient to actively engage in 60 minutes of moderate

to vigorous physical activity spread over the course of a day

Healthy

Behaviors

Children participate in self-care routines, hygiene and nutrition with assistance and prompting from caregivers. These skills are addressed in the following strands:

• Dressing and Hygiene

• Feeding Routines/Nutrition

PH.36.12 Discuss healthy practices including hygiene, nutrition and sleep

PH.48.12 Name examples of healthy practice including hygiene, nutrition and sleep

PH.60.10 Identify healthy practices including hygiene, nutrition and sleep

 
 
 
The language, communication, and literacy learning progressions included here are intended to represent common development of language skills in a childs primary language or modes of communication. Children who are learning multiple languages or children who are learning to communicate in modes of communication different from that of their primary caregiver may demonstrate individual variation in their progress toward these lan- guage and literacy goals. Those supporting children who are learning multiple languages may also want to refer to the supplemental Dual Language Learner Framework to be used in conjunction with considering a childs progress in their primary language or mode of communication through the use of this domain.
 

 

Early Language, Communication, and Literacy

 

Language and Literacy

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning experiences will support children to understand language (receptive language).

Word

Comprehension

L.6.1 Respond to facial expressions

or voices by changing own facial expression, crying or altering movements

L.12.1

Understand that words, gestures and/or signs represent objects, people or experiences

L.18.1 Understand that words, gestures or

signs stand for people, objects, or experiences that are not present

L.24.1 Demonstrate in a variety of ways understanding of most of what is communicated through gestures,

signs or oral language

L.36.1 Demonstrate an understanding

of an increased vocabulary, influenced by experiences and relationships

L.48.1 Understand words

or signs for objects, actions and visible attributes found frequently in both real and symbolic contexts

L.60.1 Understand an increasing

variety and specificity of words

for objects, actions and attributes encountered in both real and symbolic contexts

L60.2 Determine the meanings of unknown words/concepts using the context of conversations, pictures

or concrete objects

L 24.2 Point to familiar objects, people and body parts

Language

Comprehension

L.6.2 Orient to the direction of sound or visual cues

L.12.2 Can

carry out simple requests (e.g., “wave bye-bye”)

L.18.2 Remember language heard repeatedly in stories, poems

and interactive language experiences

L.24.3 Respond to questions and follow simple directions

L.36.2 Follow two- step directions

L.48.2 Understand increasingly complex sentences that include 2 - 3 concepts (e.g., “Put the blue paper under the box.”)

L.60.3 Understand increasingly complex sentences that include 3-4 concepts (e.g., “Plants are living things that will not survive without soil, sunlight and water.”)

L.6.3 React when hearing own name or to positive facial expression

Strand B: Early learning experiences will support children to use language (expressive language).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Vocabulary

L.6.4 Use a variety of facial expressions and sounds (e.g., cooing, babbling and varied cries) to communicate

L.12.3 Begin to use word approximations (e.g.,  ”ma-ma” or “da-da”) or conventional gestures (e.g., waving, signing “more”)

L.18.3 Begin to use words or conventional gestures to communicate

L.24.4 Name familiar objects and actions; use commands (e.g., “no”), possessives (e.g., “mine”) or reactions (e.g., “ow”)

L.36.3 Use nouns and verbs to label experiences, actions or events

L.48.3 Use accepted words for objects, actions and attributes encountered frequently in both real and symbolic contexts

L.60.4 Use an increasing variety and specificity of accepted words for objects, actions and attributes encountered in both real and symbolic contexts

L.36.4 Use some personal pronouns when referring to others (e.g., you, he, she)

L.48.4 Use simple pronouns (e.g., I, me, you, mine, he, she)

L.18.4 Has a 20+

word vocabulary

L.24.5 Use new words frequently to talk

about familiar things or activities

L.36.5 May occasionally use more sophisticated words than they typically use in conversational speech but that have been learned through books

and personal experiences (e.g., large, fast, angry, car, run)

L.48.5 Begin to use some words that are not a part

of everyday conversational speech but that are

learned through books and personal experiences (e.g., gigantic, rapidly, frustrated, transportation, race or jog)

L.60.5 Use more complex words learned through books and personal experiences (e.g., label favorite shirt as chartreuse, or know that a paleontologist studies dinosaurs)

Expression of Ideas, Feelings and Needs

L.6.5 “Talk” to self and others using various vocalizations

L.12.4

Communicate wants and needs through a combination of crying, babbling and

occasional word approximations, and/or gestures

L.18.5 Respond to questions

with sounds, sometimes including words and oftentimes gestures

L.24.6 Use words to request objects, have needs met or gain attention

L.36.6 Use

inflection in phrases or sentences to ask a question

L.48.6 Communicate about current or removed events and/or objects

L.60.6 Use more complex words to describe the relationships between objects and ideas (e.g., position words such as “under” or “beside” and comparative words such as “bigger” or “longer”)

L.36.7 Comment on a variety of experiences, interactions or observations

L.48.7 Use increasingly longer, complex sentences that combine phrases or concepts to communicate ideas

Strand B: Early learning experiences will support children to use language (expressive language) (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Language

Structure

 

 

L.18.6

Increasingly use gestures and sounds in coordination to communicate

L.24.7 Combine words and speak in short, two-word

phrases such as “Me up!”

L.36.8 Use basic grammar rules including pronouns, plurals, possessives and regular past tense

 

Note:  Variations in applying grammar rules may be due to dual language learning and/or alternative grammar usage in home or community

L.48.8 Use basic grammar rules including irregular past tense and questions

 

 

Note:  Variations in applying grammar rules may be due to dual language learning and/or alternative grammar usage in home or community

L.60.7 Use basic grammar rules including subject-verb agreement, tenses, regular and irregular past tense, irregular plurals

 

Note:  Variations in applying grammar rules may be due to dual language learning and/ or alternative grammar usage in home or community

L.36.9 Use speech that is mostly intelligible to familiar adults

L.48.9 Use speech that is

mostly intelligible to familiar and unfamiliar adults

L.60.8 Use an increasing

variety and specificity of accepted words for objects, actions and attributes encountered in both real and symbolic contexts

Strand C: Early learning experiences will support children to use language for social interaction.

Conventions of

Conversation

L.6.6 Show interest in

back and forth pretend games

L.12.5 Begin to understand that

a conversation is about taking turns

L.18.7 Pay attention to a speaker by pausing

physical activity, shifting gaze or looking toward speaker

L.24.8 Take turns in conversations by initiating and

sustaining a simple conversation over two turns

L.36.10 Have conversations with adults and peers

that include four or more exchanges

L.48.10 Maintain a topic of conversation over the course of several turns

L.60.9 Initiate, maintain and end conversations by repeating what other person says and/or by asking questions

L.18.8 Repeat or try another mode of communicating desire if initial attempts are unsuccessful

Strand C: Early learning experiences will support children to use language for social interaction (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Language for

Interaction

L.6.7 Coo, gurgle, smile

in response to stimulation and to initiate social contact

L.12.6 Enjoy opportunities to “converse” with adults in a more sustained fashion, including playing simple imitation games

L.18.9 Use gestures and/or sounds to interact (e.g., waves, shakes head no, reaches to be lifted up)

L.24.9 Answer a basic question with a word

L.36.11 Converse with adults and peers about common experiences or events

L.48.11 Answer simple who, what, where and why questions

L.60.10 Use language to share ideas and gain information

L.6.8 Express pleasure as adults imitate the faces and sounds they make

L.12.7

Intentionally use gestures and/

or vocalizations to regulate the behavior of others and engage in social interaction

L.24.10 Use language to express wants, needs, likes and dislikes to others

Strand D: Early learning experiences will support children to gain book appreciation and knowledge.

Interest and Engagement with Books

L.6.9 Respond

to music, stories and pictures shared with an adult

L.12.8 Engage with adults, showing shared attention to a book

L.18.10 Point to preferred pictures in books or texts

L.24.11 Point to named pictures; may name or comment on familiar pictures

L.36.12 Sustain attention for short periods of time while being told a story or reading a favorite picture book

L.48.12 Select fiction and non- fiction books to be read and attend with interest

L.60.11 Independently choose to “read” books and select a variety of texts including fiction and nonfiction

L.36.13 Recite familiar phrases of songs, books and rhymes; may chime in with rhyme in familiar text or song

L.24.12 Chime- in on nursery rhymes or repeat words or phrases from familiar stories

Strand D: Early learning experiences will support children to gain book appreciation and knowledge (continued)

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Understanding of Stories or Information

 

(Stories or information may be shared through oral storytelling, sharing of pictures and/or books)

 

 

 

L.24.13 Answer simple specific questions about familiar stories (e.g., “What does the cat say?”). Ask basic questions

about pictures (e.g., “Who is that?”)

L.36.14 Enjoy telling

and retelling stories and information

L.48.13 Demonstrate comprehension through retelling with use of pictures and props, acting out main events or sharing information learned from nonfiction text

L.60.12 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including story elements (e.g., setting, characters, events) and/or share key details from informational text

L.48.14 Ask and answer simple who, what, where and why questions related to story or text

L.60.13 Identify main components of a  story or text (the major plot points of a story or the main topic of an informational text)

L.60.14 Use connections between self and character, experience and emotions to increase comprehension

L.48.15 Make predictions and/or ask questions about the text by examining the title, cover, pictures

Strand E: Early learning experiences will support children to gain knowledge of print and its uses.

Book Concepts

 

 

 

L.24.14 Hold book upright

L.36.15 Turn pages of a book

L.48.16 Look at pages of

a book from left to right (or according to conventions of home language)

L.60.15 Know how print is read (e.g., left to right, top to bottom, front to back or according to convention of home language)

L.48.17 Recognize that print represents spoken words (e.g., first name in print, environmental labels)

L.60.16 Know that books have titles, authors, illustrators or photographers

L.60.17 Recognize words as a unit of print and that letters are grouped to form words

Print Concepts

 

 

 

 

L.36.16 Recognize some familiar signs and sym- bols in the environment (e.g., logos, signs for

familiar store)

L.48.18 Identify some printed words and/or common symbols (e.g., bathroom signs) in the context of the environment

L.60.18 Identify some familiar printed words out of context

L.60.19 Begin to use awareness of letter sounds along with pictures to read words in text

Strand E: Early learning experiences will support children to gain knowledge of print and its uses (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Letter

Recognition

 

 

 

 

 

L.48.19 Recognize some letters especially those in ones own name

L.60.20 Recognize and name known letters of the alphabet in familiar and unfamiliar words

L.60.21 Make some letter-sound connections

Strand F: Early learning experiences will support children to develop phonological awareness.

Phonological

Awareness

 

 

 

 

L.36.17 Recognize envi- ronmental sounds (e.g., animal or vehicle sounds such as “Baa-baa” or “Beep-beep”)

L.48.20 Recognize rhyming words in songs, chants or poems

L.60.22 Produce rhyming words or words that have same initial sound

L.48.21 Identify when initial sounds in words are the same

L.60.23 Recognize which words in a set of words begin with the same sound

L. 48.212 Distinguish individual words in a sentence

L.60.24 Distinguish syllables in words

Strand G: Early learning experiences will support children to convey meaning through drawing, letters and words.

Drawing and

Writing

 

 

L.18.11 Use writing tools to make scribbles

L.24.15 Use writing tools to make scribbles

L.36.18 Draw simple shapes to represent

ideas and write message using controlled linear scribble

L.48.23 Draw or “write” to convey an idea, event or story. “Writing” involves scribbles, letters and/or letter-like shapes (e.g., make pretend list or use their words to dictate a message to communicate with others)

L.60.25 Draw original stories with a beginning, middle and end

L.48.24 Write in a manner that is distinct from drawing. Combine scribbles with letter-like forms

L.60.26 Use early developmental spelling. May use one letter for the initial or final sound to represent whole word

 
 
 

 

Creative Arts

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12- 18 Months

18-24 Months

24 to 36 Months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to engage in and enjoy the arts.

Music

CA.6.1 React to music by turning to a sound source, cooing

in response, wiggling or moving, soothing themselves, etc.

CA.12.1 Show interest in singing, moving and dancing, using their body

CA.18.1 Use instruments to explore rhythm and melody

CA.24.1 React to changes in music by joining in with more extended segments of familiar music using voice, physical gestures and/or instruments

CA.36.1 Show response to qualities of different music with variations in physical movement (e.g., children walk, bounce, slide, rock, sway in response to qualities of rhythm)

CA.48.1 Adapt to changes in the basic qualities of music and move in more organized ways to same/ different qualities of music

CA.60.1 Initiate new musical activities with voices/ instruments (e.g., apply new words, add instruments to familiar song)

CA.12.2 Move body (e.g., nod head, bounce, wiggle, rock)

in response

to qualities of music whether melody, volume,

or rhythm is same or different (fast/ slow; low/high; calm/jazzy)

CA.18.2 Respond to music by joining in on one or two words in a song or moving

physically upon hearing a familiar melody or rhythm (e.g., hand gestures)

CA.24.2 Initiate words to songs and song gestures (e.g., naming animals in

a song or patting, nodding)

CA. 36.2 Respond with voice, body and/

or instruments to longer segments/or patterns of music

CA.48.2 Imitate or spontaneously sing an entire verse of song

CA.60.2 Invent own music (through humming, singing, creating rhythms, etc.)

CA.48.3 Initiate new musical activities with voices or instruments (e.g., apply words, initiate their own listening and movement experiences with some adult assistance)

CA.60.3 Play with familiar rhythms and patterns in a novel way e.g., explore, and initiate pitch (high/

low), rhythm (patterns), and dynamics (loud/soft)

CA.12.3  Use musical sounds to aid in communication

prior to the advent of language (e.g., babbles in a sing- song manner)

CA.18.3 Imitate parts of songs with words and/ or gestures

CA.24.3 Repeat words to songs,

song gestures and/or sounds (pitches)

CA.36.3 Repeat parts of simple songs

CA.48.4 Spontaneously sing songs and/or participate in songs with gestures

CA.60.4 Create music using their voices and/or a variety of instruments and materials

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to engage in and enjoy the arts (continued)

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12- 18 Months

18-24 Months

24 to 36 Months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Visual Arts

CA.6.2 React

to stimulation in the environment. This can

include drawing, sculptures

or painting. Response may be slight such as a glance or stopping an activity

CA.12.4 Respond and explore through sensory experiences such as water play, texture-books or toys and jumbo crayons

CA.18.4 Experiment with a variety of media, including painting with

a paint brush, finger painting, scribbling, gluing and taping, age appropriate art software

CA.24.4 Use a wide variety of

art materials and media (e.g., clay, dough, wet sand) for purposeful sensory exploration

CA.36.4 Create art in

a variety of media with some control and own purpose

CA.48.5 Use different materials and techniques to make art creations that reflect thoughts, feelings, experiences, knowledge

CA.60.5 Use a variety

of tools and materials to represent ideas through the visual arts

CA.24.5 Experiment with strokes and lines using brushes, crayons, markers, etc.

Drama

 

 

 

CA.24.6 Imitate simple aspects of a role using realistic props and sounds

CA.36.5 Engage in simple pretend play activities

CA.48.6 Act out simple scenarios, taking on

a familiar role for brief periods during dramatic play

CA.60.6 Assume elaborate roles in dramatic play (e.g., may play multiple roles or may stay in character for extended periods of time)

CA.60.7 Use materials and props in unique ways and are creative in finding and using materials as props desired for dramatic play

Dance

 

CA.12.5 Respond to music with full body movements

CA.18.5 Show increasing body awareness through gross motor movement (e.g., walking, bouncing, swaying, rocking, climbing) and bilateral movement (patting), show directional awareness in movements, and

use non-locomotor movements (simple finger plays)

CA.24.7

Demonstrate developing ability to balance, awareness of body (e.g., name body parts, move distinct body parts)

CA.36.6 Demonstrate directional and spatial awareness involving time (fast/slow), space (high, middle, low), or energy (hard/soft) (e.g., moving like a turtle, jumping like a frog, floating like a feather, etc.)

CA.48.7 Demonstrate increasingly complex dance concepts while learning to move their body in place and through space (e.g., jumping from one place to another, combining several movements like hopping, turning, stamping feet)

CA.60.8 Use multiple dance concepts as a way to communicate meaning, ideas and feelings

(e.g., use movement to represent leaves falling off trees – sway arms, wiggle fingers, stretch, fall to ground)

CA.24.8 Move creatively while listening to music (e.g., stamp feet, wave arms, sway).

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to explore and respond  to creative  works.

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12- 18 Months

18-24 Months

24 to 36 Months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Appreciation of the

Arts

 

 

 

 

CA.36.7 Describe or ask questions about a work of art

CA.48.8 Respond to the materials, techniques, ideas and emotions

of artworks (2- and

3-dimensional (e.g. explain a picture or sculpture including several details)

CA.60.9 Describe the attributes of various arts media (e.g., used a lot

of colors and the paint is thick, sculpture is bumpy)

CA.36.8 Express interest in and show appreciation for the creative work of others (e.g., through

body language, facial expression or oral language)

CA.48.9 Demonstrate increased appreciation

of the work of others and identify preferences

 
 

 

Early Mathematical Discovery

 

Mathematics

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand counting and cardinality.

Number

Names

 

 

 

M.18.1 Say or sign a few number names, but may not necessarily

recite them in the correct order

 

M.24.1 Say or sign a few number names, with beginning evidence of correct sequence (e.g., starts with “one”)

 

M.36.1 Say or sign number sequence up to at least five. Use other number names but not necessarily in the correct order

 

M.48.1 Say or sign the number sequence up to at least 10

 

M.60.1 Say or sign the number sequence up to at least 20

Cardinality

 

 

 

M.18.2

Demonstrate one-to-one or one-to-many correspondence (e.g., may

fill each

compartment in

a egg carton with one or several objects)

 

M.24.2 Put objects in one-to-one correspondence (e.g., puts one

item in each compartment)

 

M.36.2 Count two to three objects using one- to-one correspondence

 

M.48.2 Count up to at least five objects using one-to-one correspondence, using the number name of the last object counted

to represent the total number of objects in a set

 

M.60.2 Count up to 10 objects using one-to-one correspondence, regardless of configuration, using the number name of the last object counted to represent the total number of objects in a set

 

M.48.3 Count out a set of objects up to four

 

M.60.3 Count out a set of

objects up to five

Written

Numerals

 

 

 

 

 

 

M.48.4 Recognize written numerals

up to at least five

 

M.60.4 Recognize written numerals up to at least 10

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand counting and cardinality (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Recognition of Quantity

 

 

 

M.24.3 Name groups of one to two objects

M.36.3 Name and match a small collection of up to three objects

M.48.5 Recognize and name, without counting, the number of objects in small groups of at least 3 or 4 objects

M.60.5 Quickly recognize and name, without counting, the number of objects in collections of up to at least five items

Comparison

 

 

 

M.24.4 Compare collections that are quite different in size

M.36.4 Compare collections of 1 to 4 similar items verbally or nonverbally

M.48.6 Compare sets of 1 to 5 objects using a visual matching or counting strategy and describing the comparison as more, less than or

the same

M.60.6 Compare sets of up to 10 objects using a visual matching or counting strategy and describing the comparison as more, less than or the same

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand and describe  relationships to solve problems (operations and algebraic thinking).

Number

Operations

 

 

 

 

M.36.5 Use some vocabulary related to relative quantity (e.g., “more,” “less”)

M.48.7 Understand that adding to (or taking away) one or more objects from a group will increase or decrease the objects in the group

M.60.7 Use real-world situations and concrete objects to model and solve addition (e.g., putting together) and subtraction (e.g., taking away) problems up through five

M.60.8 Recognize and describe

parts contained in larger numbers by composing number combinations up to at least five (e.g., recognize how many have been secretly taken away from a group of five objects)

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand the attributes and relative properties of objects  (measurement and data).

See Attribute, Sorting and Patterns learning progression in Cognition

Measurement

 

 

 

M.24.5 Use

some vocabulary related to size

and quantity (e.g., say something is “big” or request “more”)

M.36.6 Have an increasing vocabulary related to number, size and quantity (e.g., use words such as “tall,” “long”)

M.48.8 Recognize measurable attribute of an object such as length, weight or capacity

M.60.9 Compare the measurable attributes of two or more objects (e.g., length, weight and capacity) and describe the comparison using appropriate vocabulary (e.g., longer,

shorter, same length, heavier, lighter, same weight, holds more, holds less, holds the same amount)

M.60.10 Begin to use strategies to determine measurable attributes (e.g., length or capacity of objects). May use comparison, standard or non-standard measurement tools

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand the attributes and relative properties of objects  (continued).

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Data

 

 

 

 

 

M.48.9 Sort objects into two groups, count, and compare the quantity of the groups formed (e.g., indicate which is more)

M. 60.11 Represent data using a concrete object or picture graph according to one attribute

Sorting and

Classifying

 

 

M.18.3 Match objects that are the same

M.24.6 Sort objects using inconsistent strategies (e.g., favorite items, colors)

M.36.7 Sort on the basis of one attribute with adult support

M.48.10 Sort and classify objects by one attribute into two or more groups (e.g., color, size, shape)

M.60.12 Sort and classify a set of objects on the basis of one attribute independently and describe the sorting rule. Can re-sort and classify the same set of objects based on a different attribute

Strand D: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand shapes and spatial relationships (geometry  and spatial sense).

Spatial

Relationships

 

 

M.18.4 Adjust their reach and grasp based upon distance, size and weight of an object

M.24.7 Show beginning understanding of positional

vocabulary (e.g., up/down, in/out, on/off, under)

M.36.8 Find objects or locations based upon landmarks and position words (e.g., “Your

blanket is on the couch.”)

M.48.11 Use positional vocabulary (e.g., up/down, in/out, on/off, under) to identify and describe the location of an object

M.60.13 Use relational vocabulary of proximity (e.g., beside, next to, between, above, below, over and under) to identify and describe the location of an object

Identification

of Shapes

 

 

 

M.24.8 Match familiar shapes (e.g., circle, square and typical triangle) with same size and orientation

M.36.9 Match familiar shapes with different size and orientation

M.48.12 Identify 2-dimensional shapes (starting with familiar shapes such as circle and triangle) in different orientations and sizes

M.60.14 Identify and describe a variety of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional shapes with mathematical names (e.g., ball/sphere, box/rectangular prism, can/ cylinder) regardless of orientation and size

Composition of Shapes

 

 

 

 

 

M.48.13 Combine two or more shapes to create a new shape or to represent an object in the environment

M.60.15 Complete a shape puzzle or a new figure by putting multiple shapes together with purpose

 
 

 

Early Scientific Inquiry

 

Science

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24 to 36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators:

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early learning  experiences will support children to apply scientific practices.

Questioning and Defining Problems

See Curiosity and Initiative learning progression in Cognition

S.24.1 Observe and make comments on things observed through the senses

S.36.1 Ask simple questions related to things observed through the senses  (“what” and “why”)

S.48.1 Ask more detailed questions including the

relationship between two things or cause and effect relationships

S.60.1 Define a problem to be solved, including details and limitations to be considered (e.g., “We need to figure out how to reach that shelf, but we aren’t allowed to stand on the chairs.”)

Investigating

See Cause and Affect learning progression in Cognition

S.36.2 Manipulate materials and comment on the impact of own actions

S.48.2 Intentionally vary actions in order to observe the effect of these actions on materials

S.60.2 Engage in collaborative investigations to describe phenomena or to explore cause and affect relationships

S.60.3 Gather data by drawing, counting or otherwise documenting observations

Using

Evidence

See Personal Preferences learning progression in Social and

Emotional Development

S.36.3 Provide personal reasons or evidence for decisions or opinions (e.g.,  “I made this picture green because my mom likes green.”)

S.48.3 Cite examples to support their ideas (e.g., “I think the plant will die because when I forgot to water my plant it died.”)

S.60.4 Give evidence from observations or investigations

S.60.5 Begin to distinguish evidence from opinion

Strand B: Early learning  experiences will support children to engage in the process  of engineering.

Design Cycle

 

 

 

 

S.36.4 Gather information to help determine if something has been designed by humans

S.48.4 Identify a problem and, with adult assistance design a solution (e.g., device or process) to address that problem

S.60.6 Identify a problem and, with adult assistance, design a solution, test and refine design elements

Strand C: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand patterns,  process  and relationships of living  things.

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24 to 36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Unity and Diversity of Life

 

 

 

S.24.2 Explore characteristics of different plants and animals

S.36.5 Observe features of plants and animals and explore function of features

S.48.5 Compare and contrast basic features of living things (e.g., body parts and their uses) between and across groups

S.60.7 Group and classify living things based upon features, providing evidence to support groupings

S.48.6 Recognize changes in living things over their lifespan by observing similarities and differences between babies and adults

S.60.8 Demonstrate an understanding of how living things grow and change through predictable stages (e.g., birth, growth, reproduction, death)

Living Things and Their Interactions with the Environment and Each Other

 

 

 

S.24.3 Observe living things

S.36.6 Observe how a variety of living things obtain food as a source of energy for surviving

S.48.7 Explore how animals depend upon the environment for food, water and shelter

S.60.9 Provide examples of how animals depend on plants and other animals for food

Strand D: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand physical sciences.

Energy, Force and Motion

 

 

 

S.24.4 Use trial

and error to explore the way different objects move

S.36.7 Observe different ways objects move (e.g., roll, bounce, spin, slide) and what happens when they interact (collide)

S.48.8 Investigate how objects’

speed and direction can be varied

S.60.10 Make predictions and conduct simple experiments to change direction, speed and distance objects move

S.60.11 Determine cause and effect of push/pull/collision that make objects, start, stop and change direction

Strand D: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand physical sciences  (continued)

 

0-6 months

6-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24 to 36 months

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Matter and its

Properties

 

 

 

S.24.5 Observe simple attributes of materials (e.g., hard, soft)

S.36.8 Observe and describe attributes of materials that are related to their function (e.g., flexibility, transparency, strength)

S.48.9  Compare and contrast attributes of common materials related to their function (e.g., flexibility, transparency, strength)

S.60.12 Evaluate the appropriateness of a material for a given purpose based upon its properties

S.60.13 Observe how heating and cooling cause changes to properties of materials (e.g., Ice melts when we bring it inside. Plastic becomes brittle when it is left outside in the cold.)

Strand E: Early learning  experiences will support children to understand features of earth.

Earths Features and the Effects of Weather and Water

 

 

 

S.24.6 Observe natural features

of the earth (e.g., land, rain)

S.36.9 Describe common features of the earth (e.g., sky, land and water) and what is found there (e.g., birds, fish, stars)

S.48.10 Observe, record, and note patterns regarding weather and the effects on the immediate environment (e.g., Rain over a period of days causes flooding. Sunny days cause the flower bed to dry out.)

S.60.14 Give examples of ways in which weather variables

(hot/cold temperatures, amount and intensity of precipitation, wind speed) affect us and/or cause changes to earths features (e.g., The stream has greater water flow after snow melts.)

S.48.11 Investigate how water interacts with other earth materials (e.g., sand, dirt, pebbles)

 

Earth and Human Activity

 

 

 

S.24.7 Talk about different foods humans eat

S.24.10 Give examples of natural resources that humans use to survive (e.g., food, water)

 

S.48.12 Investigate how humans use design solutions to adapt natural resources to meet basic needs (e.g., cut trees to build houses, make applesauce out of apples)

S.60.15 Explore how humans’ use of natural resources impacts the environment (e.g., If we catch all the salmon, this can no longer be

a food source. Cutting down trees can cause erosion.)

 
 

 

Social Studies

 

Note: Precursors to the skills  reflected  in social studies  can be found in the domain of Social and Emotional and Cognition.

 

3 to 4 years

4 to 5 years

Learning

Progression

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Indicators

This is evident, for example, when children:

Strand A: Early Learning experiences will support children to understand self, family and a diverse community.

Individual Development and

Identity

SS.48.1 Identify physical characteristics of self (e.g., eyes, hair, skin, etc.)

SS.60.1 Demonstrate an understanding that there are similarities and differences among people and families

SS.48.2 Demonstrate an understanding of self as part of a family

(e.g., parents, grandparents, siblings, caregivers)

Culture

SS.48.3 Identify cultural characteristics of self, family and community

(e.g., home language, foods, modes of transportation, shelter, etc.)

SS.60.2 Demonstrate understanding that there are similarities and differences among the cultural characteristics of people, families and communities (e.g., languages, foods, art, customs, modes of transportation and shelter)

Strand B: Early Learning experiences will support children to learn about people and the environment.

Power, Authority and

Governance

SS.48.4 Demonstrate an understanding of some reasons for basic rules in the home, cultural community and/or classroom

SS.60.3 Demonstrate understanding of the reasons for rules and laws in the home, cultural community and/or classroom

People, Places and

Environments

SS.48.5 Demonstrate awareness that people share the environment with other people, animals and plants and have the responsibility to care for them

SS.60.4 Demonstrate awareness that people have a responsibility to take care of the environment through active participation in activities such as recycling

SS.48.6 Describe, draw or construct aspects of the geography of the classroom and/or home

SS.60.5 Describe, draw or construct aspects of the classroom, home and/or community

(including roads, building, bodies of water, etc.)

Civic Ideals and Practices

SS.48.7 Participate in jobs and responsibilities at home, classroom or community

SS.60.6 Demonstrate an understanding of why certain responsibilities are important and participate in fulfilling responsibilities at home, classroom or community (e.g., cleaning up, caring for pets)

Strand C: Early Learning experiences will support children to develop an understanding of economic systems and resources.

Individuals, Groups and

Institutions

SS.48.8 Demonstrate awareness of a variety of jobs in the community and the work associated with them through conversation and/or play

SS.60.7 Demonstrate awareness of the tools and technologies associated with a variety of roles and jobs; expressing interest in different careers

Production, Distribution and

Consumption

SS.48.9 Demonstrate beginning understanding of commerce through exploring the roles of buying and selling in play

SS.60.8 Demonstrate understanding of the basic relationship of money for the purchase of food, shelter, goods and services, moving toward an understanding of the difference between wants and needs

Science, Technology and

Society

SS.48.10 Understand the use of tools, including technology, for a variety of purposes

SS.60.9 Begin to be aware of technology and how it affects life





Content Last Modified on 5/19/2014 9:10:59 AM