FOI: 2013 Essay Contest

Press Release
 
THE CONNECTICUT FOUNDATION FOR OPEN GOVERNMENT
2013 HIGH SCHOOL ESSAY CONTEST
 
CONTACT:
Mary Connolly
cfogessay@aol.com
 

The Connecticut Foundation for Open Government announces its 2013 High School Essay Contest.
 
Each year, high school students from across Connecticut compete for prizes that include $1,000 for first place, $500 for second place, $300 for third prize and numerous $50 honorable mention prizes.
 
The Connecticut Foundation for Open Government (CFOG) is a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to promoting open and accountable government. “We sponsor this contest to encourage thought and debate among students on public and freedom of information issues so important to our open democracy,” said Mary Connolly, CFOG Essay Contest Chair.
 
Details of the contest have been sent to high schools in Connecticut. The information also is available on CFOG’s website, www.ctfog.org. Essays must be at least 400 words but no more than 600 words. The deadline for entries is March 29, 2013. Essays should include the student's full name, school, grade and teacher contact information. Winners will be announced by May 15, 2013. Contest entries should be emailed to cfogessay@aol.com.
 
Students have the choice of answering one of three questions:
1. The December 2012 shootings in Newtown brought new demands that minors be banned from buying or renting violent video games. Should these games have the same First Amendment protection given to literature, journalism and political speech?
 
2. The First Amendment gives the greatest protection to political speech, but should there be limitations in the case of outright lying to the public by candidates and political action committees? Should the identities of donors to all political groups be made public?
 
3. An East Haddam student got in trouble with school administrators for advocating breast cancer awareness by wearing an “I (heart) Boobies” bracelet. A Wolcott High student was told to remove an anti-gay T-shirt that he wore on a school day dedicated to anti-bullying efforts. Should there be limits on student speech on school grounds?




Content Last Modified on 1/24/2013 2:00:29 PM