DPH: Chikungunya virus

Chikungunya virus

 
 

Chikungunya virus is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes; most often Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Mosquitoes become infected after feeding on a person who is already infected with the virus. The mosquito then becomes infected, and can spread the virus to other people it feeds on. The typical symptoms of chikungunya virus infection include fever and severe pain in multiple joints. Other symptoms include headache, muscle aches, conjunctivitis, arthritis, nausea/vomiting, and rash. For additional information please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) chickungunya virus webpage.

{Mosquitoes that cause chikungunya. Image-CDC.}

Cases of locally-acquired chikungunya infection have been reported from areas of Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Ocieania/Pacific Islands, and South America. If you plan on traveling, a complete list of countries and territories where chikungunya cases have been reported can be found on the CDC chikungunya geographic distribution webpage. Travelers should check the CDC’s Travelers’ Health webpage for current warnings and recommendations.

On July 17, 2014, the Florida Department of Health announced that the first two people with United States acquired chikungunya virus infections were identified in southern Florida. One case resides in Miami Dade County, and the other in Palm Beach County. On July 30, 2014, a new case that resides in Duval County was reported with locally acquired chikungunya. 

This emphasizes the importance of effective surveillance and adoption of measures to prevent mosquito bites. It is likely that chikungunya virus will continue to spread in tropical and subtropical areas of the Americas where Aedes aegypti mosquiotes can survive year round. It is a highly resilient species that is difficult to control. Please visit the Department of Engery & Environmental Protction's Mosquito Managment Program to learn more about mosquitoes in Connecticut.

Although locally acquired cases have not been reported in Connecticut residents, travel-associated cases have. The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) has been notified of the following cases:

 

Table. Reported cases of travel related chikungunya virus infections among Connecticut residents, by destination and county of residence, January 1- May 16, 2016.

 
County of Residence       
 Country Visited
 Fairfield
Hartford
Litchfield
Middlesex
New Haven
New London
Tolland
Windham 
 Total
 Brazil
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
 Guatemala
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
 Total
2
0
0
 0
0
 0
0
 0
2

 NOTE: Data are preliminary.

 

Figure. Reported cases of travel related chikungunya virus infections among Connecticut residents, by destination and month of illness onset, January 1- May 16, 2016. 

{CT Chikungunya travel-related cases.}

 

 NOTE: Data are preliminary.

 

Vector-borne Disease Symposium  - Presentation recordings of symposium held at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station on May 20, 2016.


2015 Annual Chikungunya Statistics

2014 Annual Chikungunya Statistics

 

To prevent infection with chikungunya virus, you must prevent mosquito bites. The mosquitoes that spread this virus generally bite during the daytime. It is best to protect yourself from any mosquito bites during dawn and dusk as well.

To protect yourself against mosquito bites please do the following:

  • When possible, close the windows and use the air conditioning.
  • If windows must be left open, be sure to use window screens in good condition. Patch any holes found in the screens to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home.
  • If window screens are not available, sleep under a mosquito bed net.
  • Reduce mosquito breeding areas around your home by removing standing water. Empty any container that can hold water (i.e., old tires, old/unused flower pots, etc.). Mosquitoes only need an inch of water to breed.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when it is not too hot.
  • Use an insect repellent according to the manufacturer's label.
  • Apply sunscreen first, if using both sunscreen and insect repellent.
  • Do not use repellent on skin covered with clothing.
Additional information about insect repellents can be found on the CDC's Insect Repellent Use & Safety webpage.
Additional information about preventing mosquito bites can be found on the CDC's Prevention webpage.
If you experience a fever after being bitten by mosquitoes, contact your doctor to be evaluated.
 
 






To contact the Epidemiology and Emerging Infections Program, please call 860-509-7994.
 
 
 




Content Last Modified on 6/6/2017 1:44:02 PM