ConnDOT: WHEN SPEEDING KILLS, ITS NEVER AN ACCIDENT
2014

CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
NEWS RELEASE
 
2800 BERLIN TURNPIKE P.O. BOX 317546
NEWINGTON CONNECTICUT, 06131-7546
 
FOR RELEASE: August 28, 2014
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS
TELEPHONE: (860) 594-3062
FAX: (860) 594-3065
WEB SITE: www.ct.gov/dot 

WHEN SPEEDING KILLS, ITS NEVER AN ACCIDENT;
STATE OF CONNECTICUT LAUNCHES ANTI-SPEEDING CAMPAIGN

 First phase appears throughout higher-risk rural roads across Connecticut;
Campaign starts in time for Labor Day holiday weekend

 

 

      With the arrival of Labor Day holiday weekend, many Connecticut residents will close the summer by traveling throughout the state to barbeques, family gatherings and tourist destinations. In an effort to raise awareness and change driver behavior, the State of Connecticut Department of Transportation Highway Safety Office is launching the first phase of its anti-speeding campaign throughout rural Connecticut, where most speeding-related automobile deaths occur.

      The first phase of the campaign will begin this week throughout higher-risk rural roads and towns throughout the state. This includes outdoor billboards, television and radio commercials, and internet advertisement.  The campaign uses graphic imagery to communicate the consequences of speeding.

      As a part of the campaign, 118 Connecticut High Risk Rural Roads qualified towns are eligible for financial assistance from the Highway Safety Office for an increase in dedicated patrol costs, overtime for law enforcement officials, special training and radar equipment. The state received $1.5 million for the program from the Federal Highway Administration.

      According to Fatality Analysis Reporting System research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, driving too fast for conditions or in excess of posted speed limit tops the list of drivers involved in fatal crashes. In addition, most fatalities occur on roads with a posted speed limit of 30 miles per hour or less.

      The fact is, when speeding is involved in a fatal crash it is never an accident, said Commissioner James P. Redeker of the Connecticut Department of Transportation. We can change this deliberate behavior. Our goal is to send a very clear message to drivers that speeding-related deaths in Connecticut can be avoided by obeying posted speed limits. Were also assisting towns and police departments throughout the state so they can receive the latest equipment and proper training to further enforce speeding.

      Redeker also added that the Highway Safety Office is working closely with the eligible towns to assist them in this effort. Local and state police will be involved in this enforcement effort, but its up to every single driver to help make our communities and roads safer to help reduce the number of speeding-related fatalities.