ConnDOT: Surplus State-Owned Railroad Materials to be Re-Used Across Connecticut
2012

CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
NEWS RELEASE
 
2800 BERLIN TURNPIKE P.O. BOX 317546
NEWINGTON CONNECTICUT, 06131-7456
 
FOR RELEASE: April 19, 2012
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS
TELEPHONE: (860) 594-3062
FAX: (860) 594-3065
WEB SITE: www.ct.gov/dot 

Surplus State-Owned Railroad Materials to be Re-Used Across Connecticut

   The Connecticut Department of Transportation today announced that several state-owned freight rail lines will benefit from track material generated from the West Haven train station project.  These freight rail lines are operated and maintained by private companies.

   Five miles of track are being replaced with all-new components, re-establishing the fourth main line track between New Haven and Milford.  The new main line track will also have overhead wire and signaling installed to operate the passenger trains that will be servicing the new West Haven train station, scheduled to open in 2013.

   “Recycling rail, ties and other railroad materials is the right thing to do.  Re-use of track materials generated by large-scale projects benefits Connecticut’s freight railroads and the environment as we mark Earth Day this week,” said Commissioner James Redeker.  “The Department continues to work with all freight operators in the distribution of this sought-after material.”

   With this project, and in accordance with a new state law, DOT will be recycling the used materials and distributing them to seven railroads, including the Providence & Worcester Railroad and the Housatonic Railroad Company; and four rail museums, including the Shoreline Trolley Museum and the Central Connecticut Railroad Museum (see attached for complete list). These entities will be able to step up their efforts to rebuild and strengthen rail infrastructure on branch lines throughout the state. 

   “This effort demonstrates the strong partnership between the DOT and our freight rail partners.  The ability to recycle these materials will increase the safety of freight rail lines, reduce wear and damage to equipment, ensure that Connecticut industries receive their shipments of bulk materials in a timely fashion, and reduce costs for our freight rail partners,” said Commissioner Redeker. “Most importantly, a significant amount of safety-related track upgrades will be accomplished across the state without additional outlays of public funds.”

   According to the DOT’s Office of Rail, Connecticut businesses ship and receive a surprising variety of products by rail, from frozen foods to bulk shipments of lumber and building materials, ethanol to be blended with gasoline, crushed rock for construction, new automobiles, steel beams, telephone poles, chemicals for water purification, crushed glass and plastic for recycling, fertilizer for our farms, feed for farm animals, and even bulk ingredients for snack foods.