DMV: Drinking and Driving - No!

Drinking and Driving Don't Mix!

Listen to Podcasts on:
{MP3 file} How a DUI can Hurt You and Others
DMV's Kelly Manning interviews Captain John Herman, the Commissioner's Chief of Staff, and Division Manager Lynn Payne of the Administrative Hearings Unit. (Posted: 7/26/06)
 
DMV's Ernie Bertothy interviews Division Chief Peter Rosso of Emissions/ Regulatory Services (Posted: 6/21/06)

Questions and Answers About Drinking and Driving

No matter how many times you've heard it, there are people who just don't get it. In fact, every 30 minutes, someone in this country dies in an alcohol-related crash. Every 30 minutes! And last year alone over one million people were injured in alcohol-related traffic crashes.

What happens when your drink and drive in Connecticut?

How does alcohol affect a person's ability to drive?
The more a person drinks, the more their ability to make crucial driving decisions becomes impaired. After just one drink, a driver can begin to lose their ability to perform the tasks necessary to drive a car: braking, steering, changing lanes, and using judgment to adjust to changing road conditions. At a certain point, a driver will become legally intoxicated and can be arrested for attempting to operate a motor vehicle.

What does DUI and DWI mean?
DUI means "Driving under the Influence" of alcohol or drugs. DWI means "Driving While Intoxicated". These are terms used by police. In every state in our country there is a legal limit to how much alcohol you can have in your body if you are driving. If you drink and drive you can lose your driver's license and even go to jail.  In Connecticut, the legal limit is .08.

How do you measure how much alcohol is in the blood?
A driver's Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) is measured by the weight of the alcohol in a certain volume of blood. Police departments test a driver's breath to measure their BAC. A person's BAC can also be tested by their blood, urine or saliva.

Did you know that a major portion of all crashes are alcohol related?
The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration (NHTSA) provides some pretty interesting statistics on the number of 15 to 20 year olds involved in alcohol related accidents  throughout the United States.

What can you do about drunk driving?

Follow these suggestions from Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD):
  • Your best defense against a drunk driver is to wear your safety belt and make sure any children in the car are in child safety seats.
  • Never ride in a car operated by someone who has been drinking.  Either call a cab or ask a friend to drive you home.
  • Report drunk drivers to law enforcement from a car phone or pay phone.
  • Keep a safe distance from anyone driving erratically.

From the National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration





Content Last Modified on 7/15/2008 4:07:29 PM