DEEP: Webinars

{Exploring Climate Solutions Webinar Series}
 
The series explores innovative and successful climate change solutions across Connecticut and the nation. The webinars provide first-hand accounts of high-profile municipal climate programs, climate initiatives in the corporate world, new greenhouse gas reporting frameworks, statewide sustainability programs, low-carbon fuel initiatives, and other programs and projects that help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and/or improve climate resilience.
 
The webinars are free and open to the public. Registration required. Attend scheduled webinars from any computer connected to the web. During the webinars, attendees may submit questions for the presenters to answer.
 
Past webinars are posted in chronological order following the upcoming webinars section.
 
Upcoming webinars
 
There are no events currently scheduled
 
 
 
 
View past webinars at your convenience. Select the link below for the webinar of your choice and then simply select the playback button. Transcripts and/or captioning are not currently available for these webinars. Please contact the Office of Climate Change at deep.climatechange@ct.gov if you need assistance.
 
 
Join us to hear from Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz, Director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. The Yale Program conducts scientific studies on public opinion and behavior; informs the decision-making of governments, media, companies, and advocates; educates the public about climate change; and helps build public and political will for climate action. Consisting of a team of psychologists, geographers, political scientists, statisticians, pollsters, and communication scientists the Program investigates how and why citizens in the US and around the world are, or are not responding to climate change, identifies key audiences requiring tailored communications, and develops strategies to engage these audiences in climate change solutions.
 
 
Join us to learn about the British Columbia Revenue Neutral Carbon Tax. Fossil fuel use imposes significant costs on society and the environment — costs that traditionally have not been factored into the price of coal, oil, and natural gas. Recognizing that this economic loophole has been one of the principal drivers of climate change, the Canadian province of British Columbia instituted a broad-based carbon tax in 2008. The tax applies to fossil fuels purchased or used in British Columbia — including those for transportation, home heating, and electricity generation. Revenues generated by the tax are returned to taxpayers through corresponding reductions in other taxes, including personal and corporate income taxes. (presentation slides 1) (presentation slides 2)
 
 
Join us to learn about opportunities for renewable thermal technologies in Connecticut.  What are renewable thermal technologies? Are they viable in Connecticut? Participants will learn about how renewable thermal technologies can lead to reduced energy costs and play a role in helping meet state climate goals. Air- and ground-source heat pumps, geothermal, and solar thermal are all examples of renewable thermal technologies that provide heating and/or cooling services for buildings and homes. Participants will also learn about current incentives and financing opportunities for renewable thermal technologies. (presentation slides)
 
 
Learn about the Utah Department of Transportation’s TravelWise Program and Clear the Air Challenge.  Guest speakers will review the strategies they are using to encourage residents of Utah to use alternative forms of transportation.  One successful strategy they have implemented to change behavior around driving alone is through competition. The Clear the Air Challenge is a month long competition starting July 1st that gives Utahans the chance to reduce their vehicle emissions by choosing alternative methods of transportation using TravelWise strategies. (presentation slides 1) (presentation slides 2) (related video)
 
 
Join us to learn about leading strategies for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by improving the way you manage and use materials. The EPA’s 2009 report, Opportunities to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Materials and Land Management Practices shows that approximately 42 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are associated with the energy used to produce, process, transport, and dispose of the food we eat and the goods we use. This webinar will look at opportunities to reduce GHG emissions by conserving resources and reducing waste. Webinar participants will learn about best practices on sustainable materials management from Shannon Davis, co-leader of the West Coast Climate and Materials Management Forum and Kristen Brown, Vice President of Waste Zero. Both organizations have developed innovative strategies and partnerships to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through materials management planning. (presentation slides 1) (presentation slides 2)
 
 
Multisolving (January 19, 2016)
Learn about Climate Interactive's research on Multisolving — the search for systemic solutions that protect the climate while improving health, equality, and well-being. Examples include energy and transportation policies that also reduce air pollution, energy efficiency measures that reduce living expenses for people on fixed incomes, or land conservation projects that sequester carbon and boost resilience to extreme events. While most people find the idea of addressing climate change in ways that capture co-benefits intuitively appealing, there are often practical obstacles to doing so. Climate Interactive, a not-for-profit organization based in Washington DC, is conducting research on the potential for capturing co-benefits in various aspects of climate and energy policy and opportunities for reducing the barriers that stand in the way. In this webinar Elizabeth Sawin, Co-Director of Climate Interactive, will share from this research, with an emphasis on lessons that are applicable at the state level. (presentation slides)
 
Workplace Charging Challenge  (December 15, 2015)
The U.S. Department of Energy EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge aims to achieve a tenfold increase in the number of U.S. employers offering workplace charging for plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) by 2018. Many PEV drivers do their charging primarily at home, but access to charging at the workplace can help to double their vehicles’ all-electric commuting range, increasing the affordability and convenience of driving an electric vehicle. The Challenge is open to U.S. employers of all sizes whose charging stations are, or will be, primarily for employee use. The Challenge offers benefits to employers who are considering installing charging stations as well as to employers who have already launched a charging program. This webinar will provide an overview of the Challenge and the benefits of workplace charging.
On November 16, the Labor Network for Sustainability is to release a report entitled "Connecticut's Clean Energy Future: Climate Goals and Employment Benefits.” Building on a national report released last month, the Connecticut study found that reaching the state’s formal goal of reducing GHG emissions 80 percent below 2001 levels by 2050 will result in a net increase in jobs and strengthen the economy as a whole. In this webinar, Dr. Frank Ackerman, the Massachusetts economist who led the research team, will review the findings of the Connecticut study. The study was conducted through a partnership between Labor Network for Sustainability, the CT Roundtable on Climate and Jobs, and Synapse Energy Economics.
 
As part of California’s aggressive efforts to meet its medium- and long-term GHG emissions reduction goals, the California Environmental Protection Agency is required to prepare an annual report tracking how reduction measures are being implemented by state government agencies. The State Agency Greenhouse Gas Reduction Report Card covers 13 agencies and scores of issues, from the renewable portfolio standard and LED street lighting to biofuels and landfill methane. In this webinar, Dr. William Dean, of California EPA’s Climate Change Unit, provides an overview of the Report Card’s origins, its coverage, and its influence on state policy and agency management. (presentation slides)
 
This webinar presentation identifies strategies and methods for development of Connecticut’s hydrogen fuel cell “Roadmap” document, as well as those of other states in the Northeast. These “Roadmaps” assess: (1) the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for hydrogen and fuel cell industry development; (2) existing and potential markets for hydrogen and fuel cell technology; (3) opportunities to leverage private and government funding; and (4) tactics for the long-term deployment of fuel cells. This presentation will also focus on the regional development of hydrogen infrastructure to support the deployment of fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) fleets in the Northeast. The presentation identifies private efforts currently underway, the role states may have in fostering private investment, and how incentive structures may help facilitate development of a hydrogen fueling network.
 
Learn about the Boston Green Ribbon Commission’s efforts to bring together leaders from all segments of Boston to share ideas, monitor progress, and engage key sectors in implementation of the city’s Climate Action Plan. The Commission is comprised of members of the Barr Foundation, dozens of Boston’s top executives, community leaders, and representatives from each of Boston’s leading economic sectors. Commission members are also working to align the resources of the key sectors, serving as advocates and showing their peers what progress looks like by adopting and promoting leading efficiency and clean energy practices. (presentation slides)
 
The Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP) is an independent and nonpartisan team of experts primarily composed of former air and power regulators. RAP’s team has firsthand knowledge of the constraints and challenges that regulators face. RAP advises public officials on regulatory and utility policies. The organization’s strategy focuses on increased investment in cost- effective energy efficiency, integration of energy and environmental regulation, and establishing policies and regulations that effectively address climate change. This webinar will provide a review on how RAP helps energy and air regulators as well as non-governmental organizations so they can assist in the transition to clean, reliable, and cost- effective energy resources.
 
PATHWAYS is a project to develop scenarios for how California can achieve its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050. The results of this analysis have shed light on the transformations that California’s transportation system, electricity sector, buildings, and fuels must undergo to meet this aggressive goal. The project informed the interim target that Gov. Jerry Brown recently established: 40 percent reduction by 2030. This webinar will review the analysis, its results, and its implications. (presentation slides)
 
Learn about the Equity Work Group from the City of Portland, Oregon. As a part of the city’s Climate Action Planning, the Equity Work group was tasked with identifying opportunities to enhance the benefits of climate change programs and policies for all residents -- and avoid potential negative impacts or missed opportunities for communities of color and low-income populations. The Working Group also provided the city with recommendations on “climate equity metrics” to help measure progress toward equity while achieving the goals of the Climate Action Plan. (presentation slides)
 
Learn how local energy task forces are partnering with the clean energy communities to engage the business community and increase awareness of EnergizeCT, energy efficiency and sustainability.  Participants will also learn about the EnergizeCT Business Sustainability Challenge (BSC), a utility sponsored program that helps businesses to develop strategies that reduce energy costs in a "Whole Business" approach. Providing the technical and financial resources needed to tackle common business issues like utility costs, waste and recycling costs, employee engagement and brand reputation, the  BSC provides a comprehensive entry point for businesses to access all energy efficiency offerings from both utilities.
 
BGreen2020 (October 30, 2015)
Learn about the BGreen 2020 initiative, a public-private partnership between the City of Bridgeport and the Bridgeport Regional Business Council, a consortium of local business groups. By building on Bridgeport’s existing strengths, BGreen will modernize the city’s infrastructure, create wealth, intensify urban amenities, enhance environmental quality, enable revitalization without gentrification, and retain Bridgeport’s historic character. Early priorities are the creation of an Energy Improvement District to support energy efficiency and production, adopting a “Transit First” policy, developing a plan for open space use and maintenance, expanding recycling, and protecting the region’s waterways through enhanced stormwater management. A Green Collar Institute will train workers and act as an incubator for developing green industries.
 
Learn about the state of Oregon’s consumption based accounting methodology. Conventional greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting methods include GHG emissions generated within the state’s jurisdictional boundaries and exclude emissions from purchased goods (such as electricity) produced outside the state’s physical boundary. A number of studies have examined the relationship between consumption and greenhouse gas emissions at the national and international levels, and Oregon is the first U.S. state to assess emissions stemming from all consumption within its borders. Based on the Stockholm Environment Institute’s modeling analysis, Oregon’s analysis provides estimates of GHG emissions released in the manufacture, transport, use, and disposal of the goods and services Oregonians enjoy. This analysis helps clarify the role of Oregon’s consumption in global GHG emissions, and it identifies the specific contribution of different product types, ranging from food and beverages to clothing and appliances. By improving the understanding of the relationship between consumption and global GHG emissions, the analysis helps Oregon households, businesses, and policymakers chart a path to more sustainable consumption patterns. (presentation slides)
 
goNewHavengo (October 23, 2015)
Learn about the goNewHavengo active transportation program that encourages healthier, cheaper, and cleaner travel in the Greater New Haven Area. A collective effort of the New Haven Department of Transportation, Traffic, and Parking; CT Transit; the New Haven/León Sister City Project; New Haven Healthy City/Healthy Climate Change; CT Rides; Park New Haven; and the Yale Office of Sustainability, the program brings together organizations and individuals to use active transportation options and promote alternative transit.  Guest presenters will speak about the initiative’s partnership model, successes and lessons learned, and opportunities to bring goNewHavengo model to other municipalities.
 
Carbon Sinks: Opportunities for GHG Emission Reductions through Land and Forest Conservation in Connecticut (October 19, 2015)
Learn about carbon sink opportunities in Connecticut through utilizing effective land and forest conservation policies. Connecticut has seen a loss of its beneficial carbon sinks due to land converted from forested and vegetated landscape to recent development sprawl. Insufficient accounting methods for land use change have omitted carbon sinks from GHG emissions inventories, leading policy-makers to undervalue Connecticut’s forests and open spaces as agents of regional climate stabilization.  In this webinar, Harvard environmental researcher Linda Powers Tomasso and environmental attorney Helen D. Silver explain state land cover change and its relation to DEEP’s climate change goals. Linda’s carbon accounting using UConn’s CLEAR land mapping lay the groundwork for Helen’s comparative review of front-runner states effectively integrating forest preservation into climate policy.  Their findings result in ten compelling recommendations for Connecticut to consider in state efforts to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. (presentation slides)
 
Stamford 2030 District (September 22, 2015)
An interdisciplinary public-private-nonprofit collaborative working to create a groundbreaking high performance building district in downtown Stamford. Learn about how one Connecticut city is reducing energy and water consumption, as well as emissions from transportation, all while increasing competitiveness in the business environment and owners' returns on investment. (presentation slides)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Content Last Updated May 2016