DEEP: 2010 Individual/Civic Group GreenCircle Award Recipients

GreenCircle Award Recipients
2010 Individual / Civic Group

Name of Individual or Civic Group

Category/Activity

Description Of Activity

Julie Blum
Westbrook, CT


 

Voluntarily contribute significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs.

Through interactions with the Westbrook Conservation Commission (WCC), a water quality monitoring project was initiated. The Westbrook Conservation Commission and the Connecticut River Watch were interested in obtaining baseline data regarding the water quality of a stream that ran through a landfill. After significant planning, gathering of materials, training, and research, an independent project to gather the information was initiated in June 2009. Weekly testing of six different water quality parameters was performed for four months on both an upstairs and downstream site.

Also, after completing the DEEP Rapid Bioassessment Volunteer training, a macro invertebrate assessment of both sites was performed. The data and analysis were presented to the WCC in a PowerPoint presentation in January 2010.

Dennis J. Clarke
Rocky Hill, CT

Execute changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15% and implement habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property.

Mr. Clarke reduced the annual energy and water consumption rates on his dwelling by making the following changes: replaced all incandescent bulbs and used clothesline instead of the dryer. As a result, his kilowatt consumption went from 2721 in the first five months of 2010 to 1646 in the first five months in 2011.

He also reduced the number of weekly wash loads and installed a showerhead to minimize water consumption. His water usage went from 18 cubic meters in first quarter of 2010 down to 10 cubic meters of water in 2011.
During the past three years Mr. Clarke has removed invasive shrubs and plants from property and landscaped with native species of trees, shrubs, and plants to feed wildlife. His property has earned, "Wildlife Habitat Certification," from the National Wildlife Foundation.

Daniel Kruger
Orange, CT

Successfully implement an innovative and unique pollution prevention plan or recycling program that generates an environmental benefit.

Daniel Kruger has worked on the No Butts About It Litter Campaign, a cigarette litter awareness and prevention campaign since 2009. The campaign seeks to raise awareness about the detrimental effects of cigarette litter, which is most prevalent form of litter in the United States and the campaign also provides solutions, such as portable and permanent ashtrays.

Daniel also participated in the statewide Connecticut Cigarette Litter Prevention Program (CLPP), which was launched in conjunction with Keep America Beautiful. This program has raised awareness of the issue on a statewide basis, reduced the problem associated with it in areas that have implemented the program, and provided a structural model for other states to implement as this becomes a national trend.

Daniel has assisted in conducting preliminary and secondary scans for the towns of Woodbridge and Orange, and for Hammonasset State Park. He also helped with placement of the ashtrays in the two towns.

The Town of Woodbridge experienced a dramatic reduction of cigarette litter of 55% at the tested sites, and at Hammonasset, there was a 27% reduction in litter.

Clayton Massey and David Massey Massey Brothers Excavating, LLC
Branford, CT

Sponsor a river, beach, or neighborhood clean-up day and donate significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

David and Clayton Massey of Massey Brothers Excavating, LLC assisted in the removal of a 35 foot, 1957 vintage wooden cabin cruiser that occupied the shallows of the Branford River adjacent to the Branford State Board Launch for almost one year. During this time the boat owner made it clear that he did not have the means to effect the removal. The Massey brothers contacted the owner with the offer to dispose the vessel free of charge.

On June 22, 2010, the Massey brothers floated the boat, placed an oil boom as agreed, removed and properly disposed of the fuel and other hazardous materials and used their own equipment to remove the boat to the parking lot for demolition. All metal was separated and taken offsite and 8.4 tons of woody debris was delivered to the Branford Town landfill. The Massey brothers completed the demolition project and left no traces of debris during the removal process.

Ian Morris
Wallingford, CT

Promote conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats.

Ian Morris led students and worked independently in the following projects on the Choate Rosemary Hall School campus: suppression and removal of invasive Multiflora Rose and Autumn Olive bushes from meadows and wetlands; construction of extensive Butterfly Garden beds registered as Monarch Watch "waystations"; improvement of riparian habitats by removal of encroaching silt and the creation of deeper vernal pool areas; planting of disease resistant American chestnut trees (through Yale University and American Chestnut Foundation); support of birdlife (additional birdboxes, creation of Red-tail hawk viewing point, photography of campus bird); and, seeding hillside with wildflower mix and planting of 1,000 daffodils.

Patrick O'Dell
Beacon Falls, CT

Voluntarily contribute significant time or resources to water quality monitoring programs, and donate significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

Patrick O'Dell spearheaded Troop #104 Boy Scouts to complete the Storm Drain Marker program for his Eagle Scout project. He and fellow troops including the Beacon Falls conservation Commission marked over 800 storm drains. Patrick, Troop # 104 and Joe Mylen, Commissioner with the Beacon Falls Conservation Commission worked diligently to complete the project before cold weather set in. Scout Master Don Ferretti oversaw the troop and Patrick went on the win his Eagle Scout.

Eddie Oquendo
Norwich, CT

Successfully implement an innovative and unique pollution prevention plan or recycling program that generates an environmental benefit.

Eddie Oquendo developed a new technology which will help and contribute to the environment at a local and national level through support programs for environmental protection in conjunction with sustainable practices and solutions for the food waste and used vegetable oil collected. The company's program works to implement a model to reduce water, air, and landfill pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, through advancing diversion of food waste and used cooking oil from the industrial, commercial and residential sector, among other organic materials management strategies in the United States.
His work project includes surveys, a planning/focus group event with attendees and direct outreach and technical assistance to waste processors and haul waste generators.

David Steinmetz
Woodbridge, CT

Successfully implement an innovative and unique pollution prevention plan or recycling program that generates an environmental benefit.

Dave Steinmetz has worked on the No Butts About It Litter Campaign, a cigarette litter awareness and prevention program, since 1996. The campaign seeks to raise awareness about the detrimental effects of cigarette litter, which is the most prevalent form of litter in the United States.
In the past year, he has done several street and neighborhood cleanups. The campaign also provides solutions, such as portable and permanent ashtrays.
Dave maintains a website (nobuttaboutit.net), which spreads awareness and connects him with people nationally and internationally who are also bothered by the problem and want to help find a solution.
He sends out letters to various groups or industries who might be interested in supporting the idea, communicate with people through website contacts, and respond to emails from environmentally conscientious people from all over the world.
He has helped institute cigarette litter prevention programs both here and abroad.
He has also been working with Keep America Beautiful on a statewide Connecticut Cigarette Litter Prevention Program, which was launched on Earth Day 2009. This program has raised awareness of the issue on a statewide basis, reduced the problems associated with it in areas that have implemented the program, and provided a structural model for other states to implement as this becomes a national trend.
For every place that implements the program, a preliminary scan is done, determinations are made as to where ash receptacles and posters would be most needed, the supplies are ordered and distributed, and a secondary scan to calculate results is completed.
Places that have implemented the program are amazed at the good results and motivated to continue the effort and to spread the word. For example, Woodbridge had a dramatic reduction of cigarette litter of 55% at the tested sites.
Hammonasset State Park also implemented the program and saw a large reduction of 27% cigarette litter.
Some new activities include: a recent commitment from the Town of Orange; a cigarette litter awareness program at Rentschler field during a "green" football game last season; working as a liaison with Keep America Beautiful to start some affiliates at the college level. He believes that this will be a great target audience, as people in that age bracket are usually very environmentally oriented and tend to congregate in one area so it is easy to get group action. Lessons learned and behaviors changed for the better will be spread throughout the country as students graduate and disperse to new locations. He is presently seeking an affiliate relationship for University of Pennsylvania where Dave is presently a student. He is excited about this venture.

Boy Scout Troop # 104
Beacon Falls, CT

Voluntarily contribute significant time or resources to water quality monitoring programs, and donate significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

The Boy Scout Troop # 104 was spearheaded by Patrick O'Dell to complete the Storm Drain Marker program for his Eagle Scout project. Fellow troops including Patrick O'Dell marked over 800 storm drains. Troop # 104, Patrick O'Dell and Joe Mylen, Commissioner with the Beacon Falls Conservation Commission worked diligently to complete the project before cold weather set in. Scout Master Don Ferretti oversaw the troop and Patrick went on the win his Eagle Scout.

Community Wildlife Habitat of Colchester
Colchester, CT

Promote conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats and voluntarily contribute significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs.

Katherine Kosiba and Ellen Falbowski spearheaded a volunteer initiative resulting in Colchester becoming the first municipality in the state (36th in the United States) to be designated as a Community Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. The designation came after more than a year of partnership work by town residents, local government, non profit organizations and a DEEP Master Wildlife Conservationist to deliver a variety of programs, projects and activities associated with nature, wildlife and sustainable gardening practices to promote the importance of creating wildlife habitats and reconnecting with nature. The work also resulted in the certification of more than 130 properties as community wildlife habitats including 110 homes, 4 schools, 3 farms, 1 vineyard, 3 businesses, 1 place of workship and 14 parks/preserves.

Friends of Hammonasset, Inc.
Madison, CT

Sponsor a river, beach, or neighborhood clean-up day; voluntarily contribute significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs; and donate significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

The Friends of Hammonasset, Inc., sponsored an annual beach clean-up removing trash and storm debris. They organized an Invasive plant day called "Free Willy" in winter led by Jon Picard to get rid of invasives along Willard Island Trail. Each year they participate in the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection monitoring workshop and also hold lectures informing and educating the public on topics such as owls, raptors, snakes, bears, and more. They also offer Native American Education and hikes to Indian Rock shelter in Madison.

Highland Lake Watershed Association
Winsted, CT

Sponsor a river, beach, or neighborhood clean-up day and promote conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats.

The Highland Lake Watershed Association (HLWA) conducts a biannual, volunteer cleanup of the roads surrounding Highland Lake, collecting trash that has been carelessly strewn in the watershed. This event is scheduled in the spring in conjunction with "Earth Day" and in the fall. The HLWA initiated a "Legacy" program accepting donations of open space land in the watershed and acting as a land trust, assuring that these properties remain as open space in the future. Under this program the HLWA is also raising money to purchase properties for the program. The HLWA publishes a quarterly newsletter that contains articles for the education of lake residents in the care and protection of the watershed by adopting sound environmental practices. The organization also supports the town by helping in the activities surrounding the annual application of weed control products and the cleanup of the public beaches.

Kensington Garden Club
Berlin, CT

Adopt a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway, or beach for a year; promote conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats; voluntarily contribute significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, and donate significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

In 2010 the Kensington Garden Club's (KGC) Year Theme was "Celebrate Earth Day Every Day". The Club provided its members with green recycled bags containing various handouts on composting, recycling, saving energy, hazardous waste and non toxic pesticides, etc. Raffle prizes included compost bins and large recycled bags. KGC members made natural flower arrangements using recycled containers. KGC volunteers at the Farmers Market were involved in the planning of the Community Organic Gardens and also donated money for flower beds. In addition, a brochure was designed on Alternative Natural Cleaning Products for distribution at the Berlin Fair. Natural Garden tips were posted on the KGC website. Among the KGC members' continuous activities include planting and maintaining several community garden projects such as Volunteer Park, Berlin and East Berlin Post Offices and Senior Citizen Center and Housing and in conjunction with UP Beat Youth Group, KGC maintains the Majorie Moore Bird Sanctuary.

Neighborhood Housing Services of New Haven
New Haven, CT

Execute changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15% and implement clean energy generation projects utilizing fuel cells, solar, geothermal or wind power and purchase "green-e" certified renewable power that equals or exceeds 20% of energy load of a business, government, or institutional facility.

Neighborhood Housing Services of New Haven (NHS) is a nonprofit agency in New Haven that has built a state-of-the-art Home Improvement and Energy Conservation Laboratory. It is the centerpiece of their post-purchase homebuyer education programming. The laboratory serves as a hands-on training facility for residents to learn useful skills to maintain their homes and conserve energy. Examples of the lab's working examples of energy conservation equipment include, but not limited to, cool roof coating, green roof plantings, awnings, photovoltaic panels, native and drought resistant landscaping and controllable tubular skylights.
The lab utilizes a co-generation system. The co-generation system used in the Home Improvement & Energy Conservation Lab is the first in Connecticut to be introduced on a residential scale. NHS is able to heat three buildings for the cost equal to heating one building using conventional methods. The generator at the lab can produce up to 1,200 watts of electricity, using a liquid-cooled engine not unlike the engines used in automobiles.

Prospect Land Trust, Inc.
Prospect, CT

Improve public access to shore, waterfront, private lands, or streams through voluntary projects; and donate significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

Prospect Land Trust (PLT), a non-profit organization operated entirely by volunteers, was incorporated in February 1993 with a mission to acquire, maintain, and manage property in the Town of Prospect so that wetlands, watercourses, farmlands, woodlands and other significant lands can be preserved in their present state.

In 2010 the PLT held trail maintenance days at two of its properties. Focus was placed on its College Farms Property. With the leadership of board member John Triana, Girl Scout Troop 60266 and members of the trust, the organization cleared the trail head, spread woodchips, reblazed the trail, picked up litter, removed invasive plants and extended an existing footbridge. For many hours of work the girls earned a Bronze Award.

PLT provides many educational opportunities each year that are open to the public. One of its newest endeavors was to offer a BioBlitz series at the College Farms Property. Coordinated by PLT Board Member, John Triana, the trail was repeatedly visited to determine and record its biodiversity. To date 193 different species have been identified 7 amphibians and reptiles; 31 birds; 3 mammals; 78 plants; 5 lichens and fungi; 69 insects. Bugs collected at the site were later identified with the assistance of Carol Lemmon, a retired entomologist with the Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station and current president of the Connecticut Botanical Society. The series helped highlight the diversity of life in their own backyards and the importance of open spaces within the community.

Salem Land Trust
Salem, CT

Open large tracts of private property for public recreation and promote conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats.

The Salem Land Trust purchased 19.67 acres of important open space and watershed land on Big Brook, at the headwaters of the Eightmile River in Salem, CT. The parcel is undeveloped hardwood forestland of oak, maple, hickory and ash with an understory of Mountail Laurel and ferns. Big Brook runs across the parcel in a 200-foot deep gorge between granite outcroppings and caves. In addition, the land is ecologically important as a part of a 2000-acre unfragmented forest block which provides critical habitat for interior forest nesting bird species such as the Cerulean Warbler, Pileated Woodpecker, hawks and owls. Mammal species found in the area include fisher, bobcat, mink and gray fox.

 
GreenCircle Award Recipients | GreenCircle Award Program

Content Last Updated on December 13, 2011