DEEP: 2008 Business/Industry GreenCircle Award Recipients

GreenCircle Award Recipients
2008 Business / Industry Related

Name of Business/industry

Category/Activity

Description Of Activity

Aegis, Inc.
Wethersfield, CT

Designing and developing building projects that fulfill Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification requirements and purchasing "green-e" certified renewable power that equals or exceeds 20% of energy load of a business or governmental facility.

Aegis, Inc., built an addition which enable them to do the following : reused ~ 65% lumber and doors and windows; recycled ~ 6 yards of aluminum siding, purchased approximately 70% of the construction material from local sources; used low VOC interior coatings and formaldehyde free products; installed low E high efficiency windows and door; exceeded insulation requirements; reoriented building to have a south facing exposure for future roof Photovoltaic (PV) solar panel; installed tank-less water heater; installed high efficiency natural gas furnace and air conditioning system; installed fluorescent bulb fixtures (exterior use daylight and motion sensors); installed low flow faucets; installed energy star rated appliances; purchase 100% of electricity from renewable resources (Sterling Planet, Inc.); installed storm water collection system; and installed "Black Sky" type light fixtures; use 80 watt Photovoltaic (PV) solar panel for powering small equipment.

Atlantic Inertial Systems, Inc.
Cheshire, CT

Donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects (e.g., projects or programs promoted by youth groups, community based organizations, businesses, or environmental entities)

Atlantic Inertial Systems (AIS), Inc., sponsored a Household Hazardous Waste/Universal Waste Collection Earth Day Event on Saturday, April 19th from 8:00am-1:00pm. AIS worked with the Cheshire Public Works Director, Joseph Michelangelo and opened this event to not only our Cheshire AIS Employees but also to all Cheshire residents. The total number of participants to bring their waste to this event was 277. Of the 277 participants 207 were Cheshire residents and 70 were AIS employees. Clean Harbors was handled Household Hazardous Waste Disposal related issues and We Recycle was handled Universal (used electronics, light bulbs, batteries) Waste Disposal issues. More than 20 AIS employees worked this event held in the AIS Parking Lot on 250 Knotter Drive, Cheshire and one Cheshire Police Officer; the Town of Cheshire provided the Police Officer.

Branson Ultrasonics Corporation
Danbury, CT

Reducing or eliminating the use of elemental mercury or products containing elemental mercury (e.g., thermometers thermostats, etc.) and successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit.

Branson Ultrasonics Corporation has initiated a practice of replacing and recycling heavy duty industrial switches that contain toxic mercury. Original equipment manufacturers were approached to successfully take-back and recycle their mercury components. In addition, other products such as thermostats and spent fluorescents are recycled through licensed recyclers.

Cartus
Danbury, CT

Promote or sponsor a company-wide or facility-wide employee commute program; donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects (e.g., projects or programs promoted by youth groups, community based organizations, businesses, or environmental entities); and monitor reductions in Greenhouse Gas emissions and meet the U.S. Department of Energy reporting requirements of the "Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases" program.

Cartus is located in Danbury and with over 1600 employees commuting to the office daily, Cartus realized the need to offer its employees commuting options. The company does not sit near public transportation (although the HART bus now services the site four times daily) so they realized the need to champion a carpooling/ride sharing program. Over the last three years Cartus has become a huge proponent of NU-RIDES, a division of Metropool. There are currently over 400 NU-RIDE members at the Danbury site with over 200 utilizing this program more than three days a week. This program allows employees to commute to work with fellow employees and/or personnel that work in the general area while at the same time earning points for valuable prices/services within the northeast. Many of their NU-RIDERS, have taken advantage of discount coupons at local stores and restaurants which they earned as members of NU-RIDES.

In order to promote this commuting/ride sharing program, CARTUS has sponsored several ride sharing days where there are special giveaways and raffles for individuals that participate. CARTUS has finished in first place in two categories (Total enrollments and Total new users) in the Tristate 5,000,000 mile Rideshare Challenge - Race to the Finish contest. They will continue to promote this program along with the other programs that Metropool offers in order to allow their employees flexibility regarding commuting.

CARTUS continues to look for environmentally friendly products and services to utilize at their offices worldwide. In addition to its ongoing recycling program (white paper, cans, bottles), CARTUS' Conservation Committee has worked with the café to use environmentally friendly products, with facilities to utilize energy saving light fixtures and electrical and air conditioning vendors to reduce energy costs throughout the site. Along with these efforts, the Committee also sponsors an annual Earth Day Fair where over 25 vendors set up informational displays which promote goods and services which are environmentally minded. In the past few years these displays have included Techniart (energy efficient lighting vendor) biodiesel (alternative vehicle fuel vendor), Honda of Danbury Hybrid vehicles, Lori Ann Trezza Soy Candles (clean burning candles), Metropool, etc. CARTUS also is part of the City of Danbury Adopt-A-Street program which required monthly cleaning of the street where the building is located.

Chrisholm Marina, Inc.
Chester, CT

Executing changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15%; reducing or eliminating the use of elemental mercury or products containing elemental mercury; and implementing clean energy generation projects utilizing fuel cells, solar, geothermal or wind power.

Chrisholm Marina has signed on to the Small Business Energy Advantage Program, which has saved them up to 17% on their electric bills. They have implemented a Clean Boater Program to encourage their customers to conserve energy, use clean practices, and "keep it clean & green" with environmentally friendly products stocked in their Ships Store, with the help of the DEP pump out grant, they provide pump out at the boaters slip as well as free pump out at their fuel dock. Boaters are also encouraged to trade in their mercury switch bilge pumps for non-mercury switches. Their biggest endeavor this year has been to install solar power on their south facing buildings, which has allowed them to reduce their dependence on the grid by up to 38%.

Efficient Lighting and Maintenance, Inc.
Brookfield, CT

Executing changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15%; reducing or eliminating the use of elemental mercury or products containing elemental mercury; successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit.

Efficient Lighting and Maintenance (ELM) provides energy-saving products and technologies to Connecticut's businesses by retrofitting existing lighting, replacing old lighting with more efficient lighting, and installing occupancy sensors, timers, and programmable thermostats. ELM also engages in refrigeration upgrades by managing walk-in coolers and freezers, controlling glass door heat, installing timers, and retrofitting evaporator fans. Through their partnership with Connecticut Light and Power and United Illuminating, ELM has been able to achieve an average of 30% in energy savings for their customers. In addition to their efforts to save energy, ELM safely removes and recycles all Universal Waste products. All spent fluorescent lamps, HID lamps, batteries, ballasts (PCB and non-PCB), and mercury thermostats are properly packaged and recycled through a licensed ALMR recycler.
In 2008, ELM's work enabled its customers to save a total of 4,788,126 KWH per year. That is equivalent to avoiding 2,924 tons of CO2, taking 500 cars off the road, or planting 252, 072 trees. ELM helps their customers save energy through lighting and refrigeration retrofits, the use of timers and occupancy sensors, and replacement of inefficient motors. ELM also recycles cardboard, metallics, and ballasts and use of licensed ALMR recycler for the PCB ballasts, mercury thermostats, fluorescent and HID lamps they remove.

Employee Volunteers of Covanta, Southeastern Connecticut
Preston, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year; implementing habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property.

Volunteers from Covanta of Southeastern Connecticut (Covanta SECONN) partnered with the Connecticut Nature Conservancy to improve the habitat for local flora and fauna at the Poquetanuck Cove Preserve located in Ledyard, CT. On October 31, 2008, 44 man hours were donated to clear invasive plant species from an area just over 1/4 acre. They also conducted two Adopt-A-Highway work days in June and October 2008 for the section of Route 12 that leads to and from the facility.

EMSAR - Stratford
Stratford, CT

Implementing a project to reduce greenhouse gas emissions consistent with Connecticut's Climate Change Initiatives in one of the following sectors: transportation; agriculture; forestry or waste; electricity generation; education and outreach.

In 2008, the 4-Elements Group performed a Carbon Footprint analysis for EMSAR to identify greenhouse gas emissions as a direct result of their assembly operations and reduction opportunities. Emission sources were identified as Scope 1 DIRECT (facility fuel usage, fugitive emissions, fleet vehicle fuel use); Scope 2 INDIRECT (purchased electricity); and, Scope 3 INDIRECT (employee commuting, corporate air travel, corporate auto use).
GHG reduction opportunities that have thus far been implemented are: retrofitting the lighting which decreased GHG; by an estimated 12%; discontinuing the use of Freon 134a an additional 8.6% reduction of GHG; educating employees on car purchases and tire maintenance, a potential reduction of 1%; and employing more video conferencing, thus, travel less.

EMSAR - Torrington
Torrington, CT

Sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean-up day and implementing a project to reduce greenhouse gas emissions consistent with Connecticut's Climate Change Initiatives in one of the following sectors: transportation; agriculture; forestry or waste; electricity generation; education and outreach.

On August 23, 2008, EMSAR Torrington employees, friends and family volunteered to pick up trash from the Stillwater Pond boat launch area. This was the second cooperative venture between EMSAR and Burr Pond State Park. Burr Pond maintenance department provided trash bags and collected the bagged trash from the road. EMSAR provided the volunteers who filled the bags with garbage and left them at the side of the road.
In 2008 the 4-Elements Group performed a Carbon Footprint analysis for EMSAR - Torrington to identify greenhouse gas emissions as a direct result of their assembly operations, and reduction opportunities. Emission sources were identified as Scope 1 DIRECT (facility fuel usage, fugitive emissions, fleet vehicle fuel use) Scope 2 INDIRECT (purchased electricity) and Scope 3 INDIRECT (employee commuting, corporate air travel, corporate auto use). GHG reduction opportunities that have thus far been implemented are: Retrofitting the lighting which decreased GHG by an estimated 350,435 pounds and educating employees on car purchases and tire maintenance. Company efforts in the area of recycling include reprocessing of approximately 1,400/month of purgings through a scrap vendor; the elimination of scrap resin/components from the trash dumpster thereby reducing the number of trash pick-ups by 50%; eight hydraulic molding machines have been replaced with electric machines which are 30-50% more efficient. A cleaning group utilizing eco-friendly cleaning supplies has been contracted.

ESPN, Inc.
Bristol, CT

Separating organic materials at schools or cafeterias for composting or animal feed and successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit.

ESPN, Inc., has converted all of their styrofoam food packaging and cups to compostable options - the ecotainer (made with PLA) and others (manufactured from bagasse) and they are now composting 100% of their food waste generated in the cafeteria and on their campus.
ESPN, Inc., implemented an employee based, used electronic recycling program in April of 2007, in which employees can bring in all types of electronics based waste, and the company will arrange for proper recycling. Since April 2007, over 9,000 lbs of electronics have been collected.
On November 14, 2008, ESPN held an employee electronics recycling drive on the Bristol Campus and at ERT in Charlotte, NC to celebrate America Recycles Day. This event was a huge success, as more than five tons (11,056 lbs) of used electronic waste was collected - more than the last three recycling drives combined just at the Bristol office alone.

Flamig Farm, Nevin and Julie Christensen
West Simsbury, CT

Converting or purchasing fleet vehicles that run on natural gas, electricity, hybrid gas/electricity, or other alternative fuels or vehicles having a mileage rating of greater than 40 miles per gallon and an emission standard level of ultra low of cleaner; promoting conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats; voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, DEP fish and wildlife projects, water quality monitoring programs, or lake, river, or watershed associations; donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects (e.g., projects or programs promoted by youth groups, community based organizations, businesses, or environmental entities); implementing clean energy generation projects utilizing fuel cells, solar, geothermal or wind power; purchasing "green-e" certified renewable power that equals or exceeds 20% of energy load of a business or governmental facility; and successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit.

Flamig Farm is owned and operated by Nevin and Julie Christensen in West Simsbury, Connecticut. The Christensens have turned their 45-acre farm into an outdoor classroom for students and individuals interested in the environment and the protection of natural resources.
Nevin Christensen makes his own biodiesel in the back of a shed at Flamig Farm. He purchases waste vegetable oil for about a dollar per gallon and sends it through his "mini-refinery" to produce B100 fuel. Mr. Christensen uses the home-made biodiesel in his two farm tractors, payloader, two trucks, three personal cars, and a 28-year-old eight horsepower diesel rototiller.
In addition to the farm acreage that the Christensens have protected through their transfer of development rights to the Town of Simsbury in 2000 and 2005, they annually donate $1 from every yard of mulch sold during the month of April to the Simsbury Land Trust.
Julie Christensen runs a Summer Farm Adventure Camp and offers School Farm Tours throughout the school year in an effort to expose children to the diverse natural environment that exists on Flamig Farm and to educate children and their parents in ways to live more harmoniously with the environment. At the summer camp, campers explore the streams, swamps, forests, and compost piles located on the farm; they hike to the mountain-side spring that supplies water to the farm; they help feed the farm animals and gather eggs from the chickens, learning that food does not come from a grocery store; they plant seeds and learn about organic gardening; they shovel manure and learn about farm waste management, fertilizing crops, and the importance of composting; and they learn about biodiesel and take a tour of Farmer Nevin's biodiesel refinery. The School Farm Tours invite teachers to bring their class on a fun-filled, informative field trip to the farm to learn how a farm operates and what farm life is like. Students visit the hen house, collect eggs, and learn how the eggs are prepared for sale.
Nevin Christensen strongly believes in combating global climate change, creating an energy -independent America, and helping to get renewable energy into mainstream use. He regularly volunteers his time and expertise in renewable energy by participating on panel discussions and conducting and hosting workshops on biodiesel and solar power. For example, Mr. Christensen was a panelist on the Biodiesel/Alternative Energy Panel at the 2007 National Association of Conservation Districts Northeast Region Meeting, and he participated in the "Step it Up! in Simsbury, CT" program in April 2007 to highlight the various biodiesel and solar programs available to Connecticut residents.
Mr. Christensen also hosts and produces "EGGSTOCK," an annual outdoor music festival and environmental exhibit. EGGSTOCK provides a day of music that is powered by a biodiesel generator, and showcases multiple exhibits including biodiesel demonstrations, hybrid cards, recycled artwork, natural and organic products, and information on environmental conservation groups. The purpose of EGGSTOCK is to bring people together in a fun, relaxed atmosphere and expose them to various things such as solar energy, biofuels, and energy-efficient products that will hopefully then become part of their everyday lives.
A ceremony was held at Flamig Farm during EGGSTOCK 2007 to celebrate the unveiling of an 11.4-kilowatt DC commercial solar photovoltaic system that had been installed on the rooftop of the farm's chicken coop. The installation was made possible, in part, by a grant of $53,000 from the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund's On-Site Renewable Distributed Generation program, which covered approximately half of the total project cost. The solar array was installed by SolarBrite of South Windsor, CT, and is the first farm-based installation in CT to receive support from the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund. It is estimated that the solar photovoltaic system will result in a reduction of an approximately eight tons of CO2 emissions per year. The system will generate a total of approximately 13,000 kWh of electricity annually, which will provide about 7.3 percent of the electricity needs of the farm. The farm's two electric golf carts are charged directly from the solar photovoltaic system. The new solar photovoltaic system will also be featured in the farm's environmental education programs to inform farm visitors about the potential applications and benefits of solar energy. The Christensens purchase clean energy for the farm and their home through Sterling Planet.
Nevin Christensen recycles wood waste at Flamig Farm. Area landscaping and tree cutting services bring their wood waste to the farm, where Mr. Christensen chips it for mulch and compost which is then sold to the public. The wood waste recycling program was initiated in response to dwindling options for wood waste disposal.

J. F. Fredericks Tool Co.
Farmington, CT

Executing changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15%; certify to ISO 14001; documenting and implementing a facility-wide pollution prevention plan; implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility’s waste stream; implementing a facility-wide integrated pest management program; and successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program.

The J.F. Fredericks Tool Co., is a manufacturer of high precision machined products for the aerospace, electronics, fluid control, food processing and medical industries. J.F. Fredericks Tool Co. received the ISO certification from Det Norske Veritas Certification, Inc., on June 27, 2008. J.F. Fredericks Tool Co., is one of a few companies to meet the new ISO 14001 certification requirements. By achieving ISO 14001 certification, the company demonstrates its continued commitment to quality, service and to our environment. This certification supplements their previously awarded ISO 9001:2000 and AS9100:2004 Quality Systems. In accepting the registration certificate, Donald Stoltz, V.P. of quality assurance noted: "The achievement of ISO 14001 reflects their continuous efforts to achieve superior product quality and service for their current customers and new potential clients. It also shows their commitment to their most important asset, their employees, by providing them with an effective and safe environment to work in. Roger Fredericks, Chairman, added: "Because of their strong position in the industries they serve, their products are well received by companies worldwide. This certification validates their confidence in them. They are proud to have achieved this formal recognition.

New England Grease Trap - LLP
Meriden, CT

Successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit.

New England Grease Trap, LLP, is working in many municipalities implementing the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection's new General Permit for the Discharge of Wastewater from Food Establishments. The company services, sells and maintains Automatic Grease Recovery Systems for the restaurant industry. These systems remove fats, oils and grease from wastewater to prevent costly sewer backups. The products save municipalities thousands of dollars in clogged sewer lines and prevent problems at wastewater control facilities. They also maintain the units in compliance with the new law.

NLR: Next Level Recycling (formerly Northeast Lamp Recycling)
East Windsor, CT

Successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit and reducing or eliminating the use of elemental mercury or products containing elemental mercury (e.g., thermometers, thermostats, etc.); and uunique recycling program.

Next Level Recycling (NLR) successfully implemented a recycling program at Fairfield University for their students to recycle batteries and small electronics at 3 locations on their campus. Each container was specifically designed for Fairfield University's "Red Goes Green" environmental recycling initiative. The same program was also created and implemented at ING as part of their Orange to Green employee recycling initiative.
NLR has released the nation’s first and only Compact Fluorescent Recycling Display. Businesses, retailers, state agencies and even schools can take advantage of the COM-PAK CFL Recycling Center to offer safe and secure recycling to all of their customers, students and employees. The recycling center is specifically designed to handle up to 180 used CFLs and each container has an innerpak liner and vapor lock lid to guard against environmental breach. Since NLR is the first and only permitted lamp recycler in Connecticut, all lap waste is directly recycled at NLR.
NLR has released the Household-Pak residential CFL recycling program. The Household-Pak is specifically designed for the homeowner. The Household-Pak container can house up to 12 used CFLs (depending on their size). The program fee covers all shipping and recycling fees and also includes a FREE Household Universal Waste Guide to help homeowners deal with proper handling of common household wastes. Since NLR is the first and only permitted lamp recycling facility in Connecticut, all used CFLs are recycled directly at NLR's facility. Once the used CFL's are recycled the resident receives a Green Certificate of Recycling.

The NLR XpressPak program makes it easy for businesses to get and stay in compliance for universal lamp, battery, and ballast waste. Each program is specifically designed for ease of use and the containers require no additional paperwork. Each container is specifically designed to guard against an environmental breach.
One low fee covers all of the recycling, shipping and containers making the program as easy as PACK-SHIP-DONE. Since NLR is a direct recycler and not a broker, businesses can be assured that all waste products are quickly and properly recycled.

O & G Industries, Inc.
Torrington, CT

Improving public access to shore/waterfront/private lands/streams through voluntary projects.

In 2004, Friends of Lover's Leap State Park, a non-profit organization, was formed to preserve, maintain, improve, and enhance Lover's Leap State Park in New Milford, Connecticut. The park contains 140 acres of state land used for hiking, picnicking, fishing, and canoeing. The park is open to the public but has never been readily accessible due to a lack of sufficient parking. This presented safely concerns because of the heavily trafficked secondary road that provided problematic and awkward parking accommodations. In coordination with the Friends of Lover's Leap State Park Chairperson, Jeanne Garvey, O&G Industries, Inc., a construction firm doing business in the area, supplied approximately 1,400 tons of base stone and 100 tons of asphalt for use in the construction of the 40-car parking facility and driveway. The company's donation was instrumental in improving access to the park's many unique features including Falls Bridge, an iron bridge built in 1895, which has been part of the National Register of Historic places since 1976. Construction of the parking lot was completed just prior to the park's dedication celebration on June 16, 2007. Since that time, the parking lot has been filled to capacity on many occasions as people enjoy the park's recreational facilities and become acquainted with the park's distinctive history.

Philson, Inc.
Watertown, CT

Implementing a project to reduce greenhouse gas emissions consistent with Connecticut's Climate Change Initiatives in one of the following sectors: transportation; agriculture; forestry or waste; electricity generation; education and outreach and sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean-up day.

In 2008, the 4-Elements Group performed a Carbon Footprint analysis for Philson, Inc., to identify greenhouse gas emissions as a direct result of their anodizing process, and reduction opportunities. Emission sources were identified as Scope 1 DIRECT (facility fuel usage, fugitive emissions, fleet vehicle fuel use) Scope 2 INDIRECT (purchased electricity) and Scope 3 INDIRECT (employee commuting, corporate air travel, corporate auto use). The GHG reduction opportunities that have thus far been implemented are: replacing # 2 fuel oil with natural gas, an estimated 18% reduction in GHG; educating employees on car purchases and tire maintenance, a potential reduction of 0.3%, purchasing photovoltaic lighting for outdoors, increasing the use of teleconferencing, and capturing waste heat from rectifiers which are air cooled.
Philson, Inc., for the sixth year in a row sponsored a clean-up event for the Steel Brook River. Philson employees, customers, suppliers, families, friends and neighbors celebrated Earth Day together at a Bring Your Own Boots (BYOB) gloves, t-shirts and all the garbage you can find provided event.

Secure Eco Shred
Brookfield, CT

Donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects.

Secure Eco Shred of Brookfield donated a paper shredding truck to the New Milford Rotary Club which allowed them to conduct a public shredding event. The shredded material collected in this event was recycled into new paper products.

Senior Aerospace Sterling Machine Co.
Enfield, CT

Executing changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15%; certifying to ISO 14001; and successfully implementing an innovative and unique pollution prevention program that generates an environmental benefit.

In the past two and half (2 1/2) years, Senior Aerospace Sterling Machine, Co. has taken a serious approach to improving their environment as well as their own personal workplace. Although they have only just recently completed their final stage for the 14001 program and are waiting for the certification to arrive: they are presently compliant with 0 major and 0 minor findings in both stage one and two of the process. In addition to the 14001 program Senior Aerospace has installed economizers on all of their air conditioning units. Recaptured air compressor exhaust is used for heat with the water and exhausted in summer months for air conditioning efficiency. The company reduced their chemical inventory and replace any hazardous chemicals with safer and non-toxic materials. The company reduced their use of solvents from a 7 to now 2 and reduced the volume of the two to only what they need in a 6 month period. The company implemented a mandatory recycling program with amazing results including e-waste.
All of their waste oils and coolants are processed and used for fuel in energy production at a cost to them; they have reduced their energy usage by replacing equipment with more efficient devices such as lighting, air compressors, and replacement motors. They have also installed air curtains and wind barriers on their overhead doors. Many of the implemented changes were to the company culture which meant retraining staff and changing their policies and procedures.

The Durham Manufacturing Company
Durham, CT

Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream and executing changes that reduce annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15%.

Elimination and removal of a vapor degreaser and all related equipment: Transitioned plant operations to an environmentally-friendly, aqueous wash with reclamation of waste-water used in cleaning. The vapor degreaser, recovery still, carbon absorber and all related peripherals were dismantled and properly disposed of. The plant has discontinued the use of all chlorinated solvents and the changes made completely eliminate the possibility of fugitive, or other emissions of solvent and/or other contaminated waste discharge to air or water streams.
Through an energy-reduction and conservation program, a 100hp , oil fired, low-pressure steam boiler was eliminated from the Durham plant. A new high-efficiency modulating burner control package was purchased and installed in one remaining boiler and a second boiler was replaced by a high efficiency unit. In addition, a 12 gal/hour, steam-fed evaporator was upgraded and switched to propane, netting an improvement of 12 additional gal/hour in evaporation. All of these actions will result in an 80,000+ gallon reduction in home-heating oil usage over the course of one year.

West State Mechanical, Inc.
Torrington, CT

Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream.

Mechanical planned for discontinuance and removal of vapor degreasing system and related equipment at Durham Manufacturing Co., Durham, CT. Vapor degreaser, solvent recovery still, carbon absorber and all related peripherals were dismantled and properly disposed of. The Plant's internal systems were modified to convert all degreasing operations to aqueous washing of fabricated steel products, with reclamation of waste water used in cleaning. Installed an evaporator to eliminate waste water discharge of residual waste from aqueous washer to further reduce facility waste discharge. The goal was to completely eliminate use of chlorinated solvents from facility operations. Mechanical changes and the new installation eliminate the possibility of fugitive or other solvent emissions, and significantly reduce and/or eliminate wastewater discharge from plant operations.

GreenCircle Award Recipients | GreenCircle Award Program

Content Last Updated on December 17, 2009