DEEP: 2006 School GreenCircle Award Recipients

GreenCircle Award Recipients
2006 School Related

Name of School Facility

Category/Activity

Description of Activity

John Berry, Science Teacher
IAR Middle School
Farmington, CT

Improving public access to shore/waterfront/private lands/streams through voluntary projects; sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day; voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, DEP fish and wildlife projects, water quality monitoring programs, or lake, river, or watershed associations; and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects sponsored by youth groups, or community or conservation organizations

Mr. Berry is the founder and volunteer advisor of IAR's Green Team. The team reported to the riverbanks of the Farmington River to remove a year's worth of debris from the Town and Land Trust parcels in three heavily used sites within town borders. Over a half-ton of debris was removed by the work crew, including several buckets worth of broken glass. The work party was especially pleased to remove an abandoned gas tank and a twisted "bicycle carcass" from the riverbed. Other volunteers that joined the cleanup consisted of nine parents, three IAR faculty members, and eight high school students who were inspired to start up their own student-run Green Team at Farmington High School.

The Green Team
IAR Middle School
Farmington, CT

Improving public access to shore/waterfront/private lands/streams through voluntary projects; sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day; voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, DEP fish and wildlife projects, water quality monitoring programs, or lake, river, or watershed associations; and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects sponsored by youth groups, or community or conservation organizations

Students from IAR's Green Team reported to the riverbanks of the Farmington River to remove a year's worth of debris from the Town and Land Trust parcels in three heavily used sites within town borders. Over a half-ton of debris was removed by the work crew, including several buckets worth of broken glass, an abandoned gas tank and a twisted "bicycle carcass" from the riverbed. IAR's Green Team's budget is self-funded from bake sales, drives to collect discarded inkjet cartridges and cell phones for refunds, and an annual Tag "Reuse" Sale. The Team’s initiatives consist of implementing composting of cafeteria fruit and vegetable scraps and a weekly collection of classroom waste paper. They also run the Recycleappolis 500, an event that invites students to build race cars made primarily out of materials that can be placed in Farmington's curbside recycle bins. The event is a friendly competition down school ramps and also a learning experience about items that can be recycled. Last year, over 30 Green Team members took to the stage at West Woods Upper Elementary to present "Get A Green Grip", an environmusical created in-house to support the message that kids should get involved now, rather than wait until adulthood.

Agricultural Education Department
Wamogo Regional High School
Litchfield, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year; voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, DEP fish and wildlife projects, water quality monitoring programs, or lake, river, or watershed associations; and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects sponsored by youth groups, or community or conservation organizations

Students enrolled in the Agricultural Education Department of Wamogo Regional High School built a greenhouse for the students of Warren School, an elementary K-6 school in their Region (#6). Students were involved in the planning and building of a greenhouse which will extend the growing time for the elementary's organic fruit and vegetable garden. Previously, seeds were started in crowded classrooms under grow lights on carts. The staff and students of Ag Ed serve as advisors to the staff and students of Warren School. It is their hope that the exposure at the elementary level will increase student interest in the Ag Ed program for future middle school and high school students.

Warren School
Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year and voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, DEP fish and wildlife projects, water quality monitoring programs, or lake, river, or watershed associations

The Warren School continues to demonstrate a commitment to a wide variety of environmental activities in each classroom that enriches both the students and the Warren community. On-going projects include an outreach garden which involves all students in the school. Grade 5 tilled and prepared the raised beds for spring planting. Grade 6 started seeds indoors and taught the younger students about planting and caring for the crops. An all school planting was held at the end of May. Grades 1 and 3 chose and displayed prize vegetables for exhibit at the Bethlehem Fair in September. Kindergarteners canned cucumbers for the annual community/school "Fall Harvest Luncheon". Grades 2 and 4 "put the garden to bed" at the end of the season. It is the dedication to this joint effort that provides our students with a tangible sense of community and the value of working together.

Beth Ulrichsen
Kindergarten, Warren School
Warren, CT

Implementing habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property

The kindergarten class studied the life cycle of butterflies, Praying Mantis and plants. They realized the need to provide an area on the school grounds that would attract wildlife such as birds and butterflies. This activity lead to the children planting flower bulbs and wildflower seeds around the Kindergarten play area. The children released the Praying Mantis and butterflies in the new garden in hopes of keeping pesky bugs under control!

Susan Carpenter
1st Grade, Warren School
Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year and successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program

The first graders at Warren School have read the books that the DEP donated to the Warren School Library on butterfly gardens and have added additional flowering plants to their butterfly garden to attract butterflies and hummingbirds. They maintain this garden by weeding, raking and mulching. They maintained a bird feeder during the winter months (stopping in April so as not to attract bears) and a hummingbird feeder during the spring and summer. In addition, the first graders helped to select, harvest and display vegetables from the school's community garden to enter into the Bethlehem Fair. They also promoted the idea of having trash-free snacks. Beginning in January, 2006, students counted the number of trash snack wrappers to monitor the success of the program.

Kathy Newton
2nd Grade, Warren School

Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects sponsored by youth groups, or community or conservation organizations

Warren School's second grade class continued to research the life cycle of the monarch butterfly. They cared for caterpillars in the classroom, and observed the metamorphosis from larval stage to butterfly. They researched butterfly habitats and the migratory route that the Monarch butterfly takes. Students participated in Monarch Watch online, and released six butterflies in the wild. Students continued to plant, maintain, and study the butterfly garden located outside the classroom, and attempted to count, identify and record the different types of butterflies visiting the garden.

Heather Nypert
3rd Grade, Warren School

Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year and implementing habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property

The third grade class at Warren School studied the life cycle of a seed, explored attributes of various seeds, and conducted plant growth experiments. Students then planted seeds and seedlings to attract wildlife to the school grounds. Lastly, students collected litter in the fall and spring around school grounds, the town soccer field, and along the road. These projects encouraged ownership and respect for their community.

Joanne Woodington
4th Grade, Warren School
Warren, CT

Promoting conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats and implementing habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property

The fourth grade students at Warren School are responsible each year for maintaining their school's Nature Trail. Students make repairs to existing signs which house information about the plant life along the trail. They update facts which they uncover through research on seasonal plants. Students obtain information on these plants through the internet and consultations with Mr. Jeffrey Greenwood at the White Memorial Conservation Center. Students use the knowledge they gain to conduct tours of the trail for parents and other students at Warren School. The class was also involved in Project Feeder Watch, which is an internet based project that is associated with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, one of the largest research teams in North America, to help tally and track populations of birds in their area. A bird feeder was purchased and set up outside their classroom window. From November, 2005 through April, 2006 students observed and recorded the number and species of birds that visited their feeder. These results were then e-mailed to Cornell for tracking purposes. Feeder Watch Count Summaries were collected and placed in each student's bird journal along with descriptions, interesting facts, and pictures of each species. Students also learned how to identify birds by using the Peterson Bird ID Guide.

Marcella Olson
5th Grade, Warren School

Warren, CT

Promoting conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats and successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program

This year, the fifth grade class developed, promoted and implemented a system for recycling water bottles, aluminum cans and newspaper in the school. Fifth grade students participated in all of the school planting which occur every May at Warren School. They work with their families to tend the garden during the summer weeks while the school is in recess. Finally, the students performed a play at an Earth Day celebration. The plot of the play involved developing land that could put an endangered species of owl in jeopardy. The fifth graders hope this play will heighten peoples' awareness of the plight of endangered animals.

Alisa Wright
6th Grade, Warren School

Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects sponsored by youth groups, or community or conservation organizations

The sixth grade students of Warren School have demonstrated a commitment and dedication to their school/ community outreach garden that enriches both the students and community of Warren School. This past fall, the sixth grade held a Harvest Luncheon for the students, families and community members of Warren. Their responsibilities included harvesting, washing, chopping, sautéing, and serving the vegetables at this luncheon. The luncheon proved to be a tremendous success as it hosted more people at a school lunch than any other school lunch in recent years. Sixth grade students also have the responsibility of generating the garden plan for this year's planting. This includes preparing the beds, starting the seeds indoors, and holding a whole-school planting day in which they teach and help each student plant seeds and plants in their garden. It is due to this commitment that their garden is able to enrich the lives of so many.

Kathi Brown, Librarian
Warren School

Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year

The Warren School Library's project for the year of 2006 was the refurbishment of the existing "Secret Garden". Students rake all gardens and trimmed back bushes. In addition, students worked on a book containing recipes served during the school's yearly Harvest Luncheon. These recipes were taken from previous cook-offs using vegetables from the Warren School Gardens. This year, students typed and formatted those recipes. The Warren School Recipe Book will be published during the next school year.

Families of Warren School
Warren, CT

Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year and voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs, DEP fish and wildlife projects, water quality monitoring programs, or lake, river, or watershed associations

Since the spring of 2002, families of Warren School students have contributed many weekend and summer hours to help create and maintain their school/community out-reach garden. Their garden, named "Harvest of Dreams" was constructed and is maintained by the support of many of the school's families. The annual "Fall Harvest Luncheon" proves to be a popular and well attended event in the town. Over 200 pizza lunches with sautéed vegetables from the garden were served during the first week of school. Annual cooking competitions are held each fall to help celebrate the garden harvest. Families pick and transport vegetables to the local soup kitchen during the summer weeks. Everyone is proud of the partnerships Warren School has formed with families and community members.

Warren School Student Council
Warren, CT

Sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day

The Student Council of Warren School organized a school wide Earth Day clean-up project. Student Council members assessed the school grounds and determined which areas needed to be addressed. The Student Council representatives acted as group leaders meeting with individual classes, assigning areas to be cleaned, and organizing the materials needed to do the job, such as rakes, gloves, trash bags, etc. They also explained the purpose and importance of Earth Day to their assigned groups.

 

GreenCircle Award Recipients | GreenCircle Award Program

Content Last Updated On September 7, 2007