DEEP: 2002 Business/Industry GreenCircle Award Recipients

GreenCircle Award Recipients
2002 Business/Industry Related

Name of Business

Category/Activity

Description Of Activity

Ahlstrom Windsor Locks, LLC
Windsor Locks, CT
Certifying to ISO 14001 Ahlstrom Windsor Locks, LLC received ISO 14001 certification #36641 on April 12, 2002.
Branford Day Care Center, Inc.
Branford, CT
Adopting a vacant lot, park, community garden, stretch of highway or beach for a year; promoting conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats and voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs The Branford Day Care Center maintains a schoolyard habitat, Nature's Garden, with a partnership with the public, private schools and community groups. They provide environmental education for the students at their center.
Branson Ultrasonics Corporation
Danbury, CT
Reducing annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15% To supply compressed air throughout three interconnected buildings, Branson Ultrasonics Corporation installed (after receiving significant energy efficiency incentives from Connecticut Light & Power )an energy efficient, two-stage, air and biodegradable coolant injection cooled, 100 HP rotary screw air compressor with variable speed drive to replace the older, water-cooled, less energy efficient unit. The estimated annual saving in energy consumption is 141,149 kWh. The estimated annual demand energy savings is 13,627 kWh. This approximates an annual $50,000.00 savings.
Brewer Pilots Point Marina
Westbrook, CT
Voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects Brewer Pilots Point Marina implemented, helped organize, and participated in two Spill Drill Seminars conducted by the Connecticut Marine Trades Association (CMTA) at two locations that simulated an oil spill, providing hands-on instruction of what should be done, who should be contracted, and how the spill should be handled. Brewer Pilots Point Marina advocates for Long Island Sound and/or dredging issues on behalf of the industry, and CMTA and its members, by attending various meetings and acting as members of committees.
Connecticut Marine Trades Association
Essex, CT
Voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs and donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects Connecticut Marine Trades Association (CMTA) is dedicated to improving environmental awareness by donating substantial time (and/or use of facilities) to conduct two Fuel Dock Safety Seminars for the 300+ CMTA membership and industry businesses in the State of Connecticut; implemented, helped organize, and conducted two Spill Drill Seminars at two locations that simulated an oil spill, providing hands-on instruction of what should be done, who should be contacted, and how the spill should be handled; and advocates for Long Island Sound and/or dredging issues on behalf of the industry and its members by attending the various meetings and acting as members of committees.
The Connecticut Water Company
Clinton, CT
Opening large tracts of private property for public recreation The Connecticut Water Company (CWC) has opened a portion of the company's Killingworth Reservoir public water supply watershed land for a hiking trail program. CWC worked in cooperation with the Killingworth Land Trust (KLT) to allow parking at KLT's Platt Nature Center parking lot near the trail head. The Platt Nature Center will use the new hiking trail for their outdoor educational programs.
Dominion Nuclear Connecticut
Waterford, CT
Voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs; donating significant time or resources to assist with environmental projects; promoting conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats; implementing habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property and sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day The Millstone Environmental Laboratory personnel reach out to 4,000 to 5,000 youth annually through environmental education programs including after-school enrichment programs, school group tours, career days, and sea life touch tank exhibits. Millstone hosted a Safety and Environment day fair that included displays and CT DEP informational packets on recycling, backyard conservation, and woodlands. The annual event encourages pollution prevention, recycling, and environmental awareness at work and home. Approximately 2,000 people attended the event. Seventy-one Millstone volunteers worked for 8 hours to rebuild and restore the trail system at the Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center. In addition, Dominion Nuclear Connecticut donated $2,500.00 in materials to support the effort. Millstone volunteers helped replace the roof on the Banding Laboratory on Great Gull Island. Millstone has provided volunteers and transportation to and from the Island to identify, number, and mark nests in support of the American Museum of Natural History's efforts to enhance the survival of the endangered Roseate Tern and the threatened Common Tern. Millstone assisted the Goshen Coastal Conservancy in their Osprey Restoration Program by donating materials and labor to build and erect two additional osprey nesting platforms in Jordan Cove, Waterford. They annually assist with the banding and counting of fledglings from the 9 nests erected on Millstone Point. Millstone nests produce approximately 9 to 12 osprey fledglings each year. Twenty volunteers from the Millstone Power Station organized a clean-up of Crescent Beach, Pleasure Beach, and Waterford Town Beach in recognition of Earth Day, removing 200 pounds of trash from the Connecticut shoreline.
The Durham Manufacturing Company
Durham, CT
Installing a 100% recycled process or cooling water system and implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream The Durham Manufacturing Company installed a 100% recycled process cooling water system and replaced a vapor degreaser with an aqueous washer.
Emerson Process Management Fisher Controls
North Stonington, CT
Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream In 2001, Emerson Process Management Fisher Controls implemented a new process for their paint gun cleaner. The new process reduces the annual waste stream of paint related material by approximately 1,800 pounds. The new method involves a program to recycle the paint gun cleaner material on site (leasing a paint gun cleaner-recycler unit that distills the dirty thinner). This cleaner-recycler unit generates approximately 50 pounds of paint waste annually instead of the 1,872 pounds of hazardous waste generated annually under the old processing system.
Emsar Torrington
Torrington, CT
Installing a 100% recycled process or cooling water system Seventeen injection molding machines were moved from Bridgeport to the Emsar Torrington facility for greater manufacturing efficiencies. At the same time, efficiencies in conservation, recycling, and preservation measures were considered. This consideration led to the purchasing of a new cooling tower and two state-of-the-art microprocessor based controls for both the existing and new cooling towers. The cooling tower itself should save Emsar 97% of additional waters required to run these seventeen molding machines. The two microprocessors control the tower bleed rates, reducing overall water usage. This is accomplished as the unit reads total dissolved solids and automatically bleeds at a predetermined set point. The set point optimizes water usage and maintains system efficiency. Tower efficiency is maintained as there is no "guess work" involved on bleed rates and volumes discharged. The microprocessor also controls chemical addition rates. The automatic chemical addition relates to increased employee safety, as there is no handling of chemicals. The risk of a release is also minimized and there is virtually no chemical waste.
Emsar, Incorporated
Stratford, CT
Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream In 2000, Emsar's quality assurance department developed a vacuum test fixture utilized for pump leakage testing that, in 2001, decreased hazardous waste disposal by 89%, decreased the purchase of isopropyl alcohol by 43%, and virtually eliminated the purchase of aluminum cans for leakage testing. In 2002, utilizing the vacuum test fixture, Emsar has achieved a 100% reduction of this waste stream. The vacuum test fixture allows for the same aluminum can package to be re-used. The package is filled once with a 50/50 isopropyl alcohol solution and topped off periodically. Prior to the implementation of the vacuum testing fixture, aluminum can packages could be used only once. Each package would be filled with the 50/50 isopropyl alcohol, individually crimped, and run through one leak test. Subsequently, the entire package, filled with isopropyl alcohol, would be disposed of as a hazardous waste.
General Cable Industries, Inc.
Willimantic, CT
Installing a 100% recycled process or cooling water system General Cable Industries, Inc. installed a closed-loop cooling water system that eliminated the discharge of almost one million gallons per day of process and non-process wastewater to the Willimantic River. With the installation of this system, General Cable was also able to eliminate the diversion of almost one million gallons of water from the Willimantic River. The design and installation incorporated high efficiency equipment and controls to further reduce electricity consumption. The new system also led to the elimination of several permitted discharges to the Willimantic River including 14 tons per year of biochemical oxygen demand, 15 tons per year of total suspended solids, 13 tons per year of oil and grease, and 2.6 tons per year of heavy metals.
Hamilton Sundstrand
Farmington, CT
Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream Hamilton Sundstrand, Farmington facility, eliminated the use of alkaline stripper (Ecco stripper 801) and replaced it with a "dip strip salt pot". This change in processing will reduce company hazardous waste by 3,000 pounds as well as reduce operating costs.
Hamilton Sundstrand
Windsor Locks, CT
Documenting and implementing a facility-wide pollution prevention plan Hamilton Sundstrand, Windsor Locks facility, has three site-wide Pollution Teams that focus on process, non-process and packaging practices to reduce solid waste, reduce water consumption, increase recycling and increase use of reusable packaging at the facility. In the first two quarters of 2002, the facility recycled 98,000 pounds of paper, 67,000 pounds of cardboard, 439,000 pounds of metal, 108,000 pounds of wood, 19,000 pounds of concrete, 1,400,000 gallons of wastewater, and eliminated 31,000 pounds of packaging waste.
Howmet Corporate Machining
Winsted, CT
Reducing or eliminating the use of elemental mercury or products containing mercury (thermometers, thermostats, etc.); documenting and implementing a facility-wide pollution prevention plan; implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream; and implementing habitat enhancements for fish or wildlife on public or private property Howmet Corporate Machining is committed to operating in a safe, responsible manner that respects the environment and the health of their employees, their customers and the community. They reduced their discharge of process wastewater from approximately 14,000 gallons per day to approximately 1,200 gallons per day by purchasing and installing three wastewater evaporators. The company implemented the Alcoa Eight Step Waste Minimization Process Program which includes projects such as replacing acetone as an adhesive remover with a citrus-based adhesive remover. Processing changes such as this typically lead to lower VOC emissions and a reduction in the toxicity of the facility’s waste stream. To celebrate Earth Day, Howmet Corporate Machining purchased 500 tree seedlings from the Litchfield Conservation District and donated them to local elementary school Earth Day celebrations and gave their employees the remaining seedlings for their homes. The company was able to change its hazardous waste generator status from a large quantity to small quantity generator by switching from a hazardous parts washing solvent to a non-hazardous solution. This significantly reduced company waste generation volumes. Howmet Corporate Machining removed mercury-containing thermometers from their plant and replaced them with non-hazardous, non-mercury containing thermometers.
Mott Corporation
Farmington, CT
Installing a 100% recycled process or cooling water system and reducing annual energy or water consumption rates by more than 15% Mott Corporation installed a recycled process cooling water system eliminating a once-through non-contact water cooling system. The new system saves a minimum of 2.6 million gallons per year to a maximum potential of 15 million gallons per year. The new system will have the impact of saving over 95% of the water usage for the manufacturing facility during the first year of operation.
Niantic Bay Marina, Inc.
Waterford, CT
Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream Niantic Bay Marina stopped using chloride cleaners and acetone. They have oil separators in all catch basins and they keep their waste oil and anti-freeze contained in concrete.
Pfizer Global Manufacturing
Groton, CT
Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream Pfizer Global Manufacturing in Groton developed and implemented a process to recycle solvents. This allowed the spent solvents from a production process to be recovered and recycled back into the same process. This significantly reduced the amount of spent solvent requiring disposal and also reduced the amount of new solvent required by the process. This was completed for three manufacturing steps of this product. Approximately 800,000 gallons of solvent will be recycled annually. Over 250 truck shipments a year for new and waste solvents have been eliminated as a result of this recycling effort. They also implemented a process change to replace the use of 55 gallon drums with reusable totes. The 55 gallon drums were used once and discarded. This change reduced the amount of drums used and discarded by 2,400 drums per year.
Philson Incorporated
Watertown, CT
Installing a 100% recycled process or cooling water system; implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream; sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day and successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program and exceeding mandatory recycling requirements and goals Philson Incorporated began to recycle all disposable battery products, thereby diverting them from the company waste stream and ultimately some landfill. A battery collection vessel was placed near the front lobby for spent batteries generated by the company or its employees. Philson also recycles cardboard, white office paper, aluminum production scrap, and phosphoric acid. The company was able to reduce its water consumption rates by installing a cooling coil in one of its process tanks. Rather than installing a new water line which would consume more fresh water for the manufacturing process, the company engineered the "new" water source to come from an existing cooling coin and discharge into the final rinse station. Re-navigating the water source enabled the company to meet its new cooling demand and the already established final rinsing. The effort was so successful, the company installed a similar unit in their secondary production line. The annual water conservation numbers equate to approximately 624,000 gallons. The company introduced a stagnant rinse on the sealer line substituting a gold sealer with one containing a lower concentration of nickel. The processing change eliminates about 40 pounds of nickel from the company waste stream. The sealer now can operate at a lower temperature, thereby requiring less steam to heat the tank. This lowers the need for steam which results in less evaporation and a savings of approximately 5000 gallons of water per year. A condensate return tank was installed which recycles 100 per cent of the condensate generated from the heating of all production tanks and returns this water to the boiler. The savings total approximately 468,000 gallons of water and 5,000 gallons of #2 heating oil annually. On April 2, 2002, Philson initiated and sponsored the first Steele Brook River Conservation Clean-up event. The event drew 17 employees, neighbors and fire personnel and resulted in the collection and disposal of 5 yards of trash and debris.
Pitney Bowes, Inc.
Stamford, CT
Documenting and implementing a facility-wide pollution prevention plan Pitney Bowes formed committees throughout their entire corporation with the specific goal of seeking solutions to reduce the volume of non-hazardous solid wastes generated at their facilities. The committees focused on prevention, collection of recyclables, and purchasing or manufacturing recycled products. These efforts resulted in the recycling of 5,595 tons of solid waste, achieving an overall recycling rate of 72% at 28 facilities in the United States. Some of their projects included converting from cardboard boxes to plastic totes; recycled return postage meter carrying cases; replacing styrofoam peanuts with a recyclable #2 high density polyethylene film that heat seals to itself forming an air pillow; re-grinding post-production plastic scrap for re-introduction to the manufacturing process; recycling plastic components of returned equipment and excess wood pallets; shredding inbound cardboard into a packaging medium for outbound shipment of product to customers; collected block styrofoam from inbound shipments; and reusing oil-absorbed carpet materials around machinery.
Q Real Estate
Farmington, CT
Successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program Q Real Estate has taken corporate responsibility to the next level in its efforts to reduce tag sale litter in Connecticut communities. The company has had reusable Tag Sale signs professionally designed and manufactured. Homeowners are encouraged to use these signs at no charge. The signs measure 18" x 24", are magenta in color, and come in self-contained metal A-frames that are easy to carry and setup. This public service program is an example of how companies can get involved in the effort to save trees and eliminate unnecessary litter in our communities. The signs are intended to keep our streets and neighborhoods neat and clean by helping to prevent the use of flimsy paper signs that often are abandoned or fall off the trees and poles they were affixed to.
Record-Journal Publishing Company
Meriden, CT
Consistently using more than 40% recycled fiber in newspaper and other newsprint publications Record-Journal Publishing Company consistently uses more than 40% recycled fiber in newspaper and other newsprint publications.
Saybrook Point Inn & Spa
Old Saybrook, CT
Successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program Saybrook Point Inn & Spa installed water recycling laundry equipment with ozone to reduce hotwater, water soap, bleach and propane gas usage. They also improved effluent quality being discharged into the septic system.
SoundWaters, Inc.
Stamford, CT
Promoting conservation and preservation of critical plant or animal habitats; voluntarily contributing significant time or resources to environmental instructional programs and sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day In December, 2001, SoundWaters established Friends of SoundWaters and Holly Pond, a community-based initiative to preserve and protect Holly Pond, an estuary bounded by Stamford and Darien. The Pond and neighboring Cove Island Park have been named an Important Bird Area by Connecticut Audubon, with 272 identified nesting and migratory species. It links the Noroton River with Long Island Sound, receiving polluted run-off from the river and upstream industrial sites. SoundWaters has brought together those who share a common interest in Holly Pond to identify issues that impact the Pond and its ecosystem, to improve awareness and provide objective education to the issues. Their completed activities include: two lectures reporting the results of Pond research on sediment and living marine resources that was conducted by Fairfield University student interns at SoundWaters; a Pond clean-up where more than 100 volunteers picked up 3,600 cubic feet of debris; and four naturalist-led canoe trips to identify wildlife and habitats.
Stericycle, Inc.
Middletown, CT
Reducing or eliminating the use of elemental mercury or products containing mercury (thermometers, thermostats, etc.) and successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program Stericycle, Inc., a bio-medical waste transporter and treatment company, recycled 261 pounds of dental amalgam (50% mercury) at no cost to the customer and recycled 4,916 pounds of lead foil (the backing behind dental bite wing x-rays), thereby keeping these products out of the Connecticut solid waste stream.
Sunrun Gardens
Thompson, CT
Implementing clean energy generation projects utilizing fuel cells, solar, geothermal or wind power Sunrun Gardens upgraded their solar-powered water pumping system for their farmstand garden.
Target Corporation, MPLS, MN
River Falls, WI
Documenting and implementing a facility-wide pollution prevention plan; sponsoring a river, beach or neighborhood clean up day; participating in a voluntary employee commute program (e.g. vanpool, carpool); achieving a municipal recycling rate of 35% or more for the previous fiscal year and successfully implementing an innovative and unique recycling program and exceeding mandatory recycling requirements and goals Target has implemented a number of innovations such as: an extremely effective national program of waste reduction (the future goal being zero waste); being the first major retailer to virtually eliminate excess packaging on clothing lines and work with other vendors to minimize packaging; doing yearly self-assessment of its environmental operations and publishing the results in an annual report; and offering products made from recycled content. Target Corporation's five stores in Connecticut recycled 1,005.53 tons of old corrugated cardboard in 2001. Target has been recycling for 30 years and, through committed efforts, recycles 75% of its store waste materials. Almost 100% of the clothing Target sells arrives without excess packaging, and 95% of all shoes arrive without stuffing. This year, 20 million shoeboxes made with 80 to 100% recycled paper were shipped to their stores. Pallets are fixed, recycled or sold. Discarded boxes become recycling bins. Stores eliminate waste by selling usable goods to local non-profits or donating out-of-season or no-salable goods like cat litter, pet food and personal care products to charitable organizations or to humane societies. Incentive programs are offered for vehicle trip reduction including commuter vans, discounts on mass transportation, and designated carpool parking. Team members are offered incentives such as flexible scheduling and job-sharing. Each store monitors the cost benefits resulting from the revenue of recyclables, the offset waste hauling and disposal costs, and the increased efficiency of improved processes. Their recycling efforts have reduced 28,632.8 tons of cardboard, 1,105.1 tons of paper, 3,194.4 tons of plastic film, 161.3 tons of batteries, 84.3 tons of food waste, 1,711.3 tons of hangers, 916.5 tons of bulbs/ballasts, plus nickel, cadmium, lead acid, button batteries, aluminum and metal, shrink-wrap, plastic and glass bottles, printer cartridges and ribbons, and outdated computers. Target is continuously providing environmental education to store employees by distributing innovative communication tools, including "Environmental Quest" and "Environmental Issues". They also offer training to its new buyers to raise awareness about eco-product alternatives. Some of the recycled products sold at Target are doormats made from recycled tires, greeting cards made from 100% recycled greeting cards, snowboards made from 30% recycled material, basketball backboards made from 80% recycled eco-composite, paper-notebooks made with recycled paper, and home furnishings that do not contain wood from old growth forests. Every year Target team members go into the community for Park/River/Lake/Ocean Clean-ups, Tree/Flower Plantings, Adopt-a-highway, and City Clean-ups. Target's Environmental Team participates in the following organizations: America Recycles Day; University of Minnesota Raptor Center; EPA Energy Star; Business for Social Responsibility; Waste Wise; Buy Recycled Business Alliance; National Recycling Coalition; Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation; Recycling Association of Minnesota; and Minnesota Environmental Initiative. Non-saleable diapers, formula, clothing and hygiene items are donated to homeless and women's shelters, day care centers, and schools.
The Torrington Company
Division of Ingersoll-Rand
Torrington, CT
Certifying to ISO 14001 This facility is one of nine North American facilities (two in Connecticut) of The Torrington Company, Division of Ingersoll-Rand's Automotive Divisions that received certification in March, 2002 to ISO 14001 (Certification #ISO 14001:1996).
The Torrington Company
Division of Ingersoll-Rand
Watertown, CT
Certifying to ISO 14001 This facility is one of nine North American facilities (two in Connecticut) of The Torrington Company, Division of Ingersoll-Rand's Automotive Divisions that received certification in March, 2002 to ISO 14001 (Certification #ISO 14001:1996).
UTC Fuel Cells, LLC
South Windsor, CT
Implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream UTC Fuel Cells, LLC installed a stormwater treatment system designed to remove elevated levels of metals in their stormwater runoff. This treatment system consists of a 300 foot long vegetated swale that treats first-flush stormwater runoff from an area of greater than 7 acres. The swale has dramatically improved the quality of stormwater runoff from the facility. Recent stormwater sample results indicate that the swale is capable of the following pollutant removals from the first flush of a stormwater event: 98 percent reduction in copper; 95 percent reduction in lead; 88 percent reduction in zinc; 77 percent reduction in total suspended solids; 67 percent reduction in chemical oxygen demand; and almost 100 percent reduction in nitrate. The system has raised runoff pH from an acidic level to a near neutral range. The swale system was a significant investment by UTC Fuel Cells - demonstrating their commitment to improving the State's water qualify and the environment. They would like to acknowledge the contributions of Fuss & O’Neill and DEP staff on this project.
West State Mechanical, Inc.
Torrington, CT
Installing a 100% recycled process or cooling water system and implementing manufacturing processes that eliminate or significantly reduce the quantity or toxicity of a facility's waste stream West State Mechanical replaced solvent degreaser cleaning systems with aqueous washers with self contained tanking and no waste water stream to the environment.

GreenCircle Award Recipients | GreenCircle Award Program

Content Last Updated on December 19, 2006