DEEP: Biomass

 What is Biomass?

{Images of various sources of biomass materials}

Biomass is renewable, organic material that can be used as a fuel or energy source. Some examples include all types of plant materials (forest thinnings, agricultural crops and residue, wood and wood waste), animal waste, landfill methane gas, sewage and solid waste.

Renewable energy in CT What is "sustainable biomass"? CT Agencies involved in biomass Biomass energy facilities in CT Links

Renewable energy in Connecticut

Connecticut statutes define "renewable sources of energy" as energy from direct solar radiation, wind, water, geothermal sources, wood and other forms of biomass.

Connecticut has a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that requires electricity providers obtain a minimum percentage of their retail load from renewable energy. The RPS outlines the three classes of renewable energy. For 2007, the RPS is 7.5% increasing to 14% by 2010, 19.5% by 2015 and 27% by 2020.

What is "sustainable biomass "?

The term sustainable biomass has been defined in the Connecticut General Statutes Section16-1(a)(45) as biomass that is cultivated and harvested in a sustainable manner. Sustainable biomass can most likely be certified as a Class I renewable energy source and generally does not mean construction and demolition waste, as defined in CGS section 22a-208x, finished biomass products from sawmills, paper mills or stud mills, organic refuse fuel derived separately from municipal solid waste, or biomass from old growth timber stands. However, there are some exceptions. Please see the full definition.

Connecticut Agencies involved in biomass

In Connecticut, agencies that in some way manage or oversee energy issues typically have some involvement in biomass.

  • Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP)
    The DEEP reviews and issues permits necessary for constructing and operating biomass facilities, and has a role in planning and policy regarding the management of the state’s forests, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and energy.
  • Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) (formerly the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund) CEFIA promotes, develops and invests in clean energy sources for the benefit of Connecticut ratepayers. In April 2005, an assessment of biomass fuel supply in Connecticut was prepared by Antares. Connecticut has invested in biomass projects, including those that were part of the Project 150 initiative. Project 150 is aimed at increasing clean energy supply in Connecticut by at least 150 megawatts (MWs) of installed capacity. This initiative creates an opportunity for developers, manufacturers and financiers to advance Connecticut-based "Class I" clean renewable energy projects. Through legislation, Project 150 mandates local electric distribution companies to enter into long-term power purchase agreements for no less than 150 MW with generators of "Class I" renewable energy
  •  The Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) regulates utility companies in Connecticut and oversees the Renewable Portfolio Standards.
  • The Institute for Sustainable Energy at Eastern Connecticut State University has information on energy alternatives and sustainability for Connecticut’s users and providers of energy.

Biomass energy facilities in Connecticut

The following list is subject to change. For up-to-date information on biomass facilities and proposed facilities, contact the CEFIA and/or PURA.

Proposed facilities:

Links

 
 
Content Last updated July 2013