DEEP: 319 Project Table

DEEP 319 and other Nonpoint Source Funded Projects 2005-2009
 
 
Statewide Projects
 
05-01   AFO/CAFO Project Series (NRCS/UConn) $106,000
Provide training to NRCS’s Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) participants about implementing, maintaining, and evaluating Nutrient Management Plans (NMPs).  The NMPs are field-by-field records of recommendations for manure and fertilizer applications, and nutrient management practices performed by agricultural producers.  Also provide training about the use and fate of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and the concepts underlying the management of nutrients.  The training will emphasize methods to minimize the risks to surface water and groundwater resources associated with land application of manure nutrients to cropland, hay land and pasture. Provide one-on-one assistance to farmers to implement waste utilization and nutrient management practices. Train AFO/CAFO farms and Technical Service Providers on nutrient management to assist in the implementation of comprehensive nutrient management plans.  It is expected that an average of five (5) new EQIP contracts will be signed each fiscal year.
 
06-01   AFO/CAFO Project Series (UConn) $80,000
The primary objective of the project is to provide training to NRCS’s Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) participants about establishing and maintaining Nutrient Management Plans (NMPs).  The NMPs are field-by-field records of recommendations for manure and fertilizer applications, and the nutrient management practices performed by agricultural producers.  The secondary objective is to develop and test a recordkeeping datanbase to ease the task of data entry, to improve the reliability of data, reduce errors, improve analysis and enhance technical implementations and recommendations to agricultural producers who are developing and implementing NMPs.  The last objective is to provide training about the use and fate of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and the concepts underlying the management of nutrients.  The training will emphasize methods to minimize the risks to surface water and groundwater resources associated with land application of manure nutrients to cropland, hay land and pasture. It is expected that an average of five (5) new EQIP contracts will be signed each fiscal year.  The additional EQIP contracts are expected to cover 1500 acres of cropland per year.
 
07-01   AFO/CAFO Series (UConn) $70,000
Provide training to NRCS’s Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) participants about establishing and maintaining Nutrient Management Plans (NMPs).  The NMPs are field-by-field records of recommendations for manure and fertilizer applications, and nutrient management practices performed by agricultural producers.  Also provide training about the use and fate of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and the concepts underlying the management of nutrients.  The training will emphasize methods to minimize the risks to surface water and groundwater resources associated with land application of manure nutrients to cropland, hay land and pasture.  It is expected that an average of five (5) new EQIP contracts will be signed each fiscal year.  The additional EQIP contracts are expected to cover 1,000 acres of cropland per year.
 
08-01   AFO/CAFO Series (University of Connecticut UConn Plant Science) $70,000
The primary objective of the project is to provide training to NRCS’s Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) participants about establishing and maintaining Nutrient Management Plans (NMPs).  UConn will target watersheds with on-going watershed base planning efforts such as the Niantic, Coginchaug, Broad Brook, and Little River.  The NMPs are field-by-field records of recommendations for manure and fertilizer applications, and the nutrient management practices performed by agricultural producers.  The secondary objective is to provide training about the use and fate of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and the concepts underlying the management of nutrients.  The training will emphasize methods to minimize the risks to surface water and groundwater resources associated with land application of compost and manure to cropland, hay land and pasture.  Training about the proper storage of compost and manure will also be taught.  It is expected that an average of five (5) new EQIP contracts will be signed each fiscal year.  The additional EQIP contracts are expected to cover 1,000 acres of cropland per year.
 
09-01   AFO/CAFO Series (UConn) $69,000 - Provide training to NRCS’s Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) participants about establishing and maintaining Nutrient Management Plans (NMPs).  The NMPs are field-by-field records of recommendations for manure and fertilizer applications, and nutrient management practices performed by agricultural producers.  Also provide training about the use and fate of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and the concepts underlying the management of nutrients.  The training will emphasize methods to minimize the risks to surface water and groundwater resources associated with land application of manure nutrients to cropland, hay land and pasture.  It is expected that an average of five (5) new EQIP contracts will be signed each fiscal year.  The additional EQIP contracts are expected to cover 1,000 acres of cropland per year.
 
05-03   Nonpoint Source Education for Municipal Outreach Support Tools/Protect Water Quality (Uconn NEMO) $70,000
NEMO will further the 319 program goal of improving the state’s impaired waters by focusing its Municipal Initiative education program from a statewide to the Thames River Watershed.  NEMO will create an interactive mapping website,  which will provide the tools necessary for municipalities to utilize statewide available databases for land use planning and site design evaluation to protect water quality. A statewide Natural Resource Inventory Online website will also be created as a tool for water resourece protection.  The web site design will build on the existing Focus on the Coast project, a partnership with DEEP/OLISP that provides both guidance on landscape analysis processes and web-based mapping services to local land use decision makers in the state’s coastal towns.
 
06-03   NEMO Catalyzing Community Action towards Addressing Impaired Waters through Education and Outreach - Site Planning for Post-Construction (UConn) $75,000
NEMO will provide outreach for municipalities preparing new or dealing with existing TMDL related stormwater plans and develop a statewide database of Low Impact Development (LID) practices along with a workshop for contractors and installers.  Part one is a targeted Municipal Initiative approach in support of DEEP’s TMDL program.  NEMO will provide chosen towns with receive education, advice, and review of new plans and regulations developed by the towns in response to TMDLs developed for a waterbodies in their jurisdictions. Part 2 will further develop and deliver two contractor/installer workshops using local/regional examples highlighting the principals and practices as outlined in the DEEP’s 2004 Connecticut Stormwater Manual.  The goal of this training is to raise awareness within the construction industry of the Stormwater Manual and proper construction techniques and practices.
 
07-02   NEMO (UConn) $70,000
NEMO will further the 319 program goal of improving the state’s impaired waters by promoting low impact development (LID) with two critical audiences. First, a LID training program, based on our successful municipal initiative program, targeting those communities that have been involved in a watershed-based plan for TMDL implementation. The primary goal of this training is to help the towns implement LID practices in their plans and regulations. The second approach is a bioretention training program that will target homeowners. NEMO will leverage existing resources including the new NEMO publication “Rain Gardens in Connecticut: A Design Guide for Homeowners,” and the unique delivery system of the UConn Master Gardeners program as principal trainers.
 
05-04   Reduced Pesticide/Nutrient Loading Thames (UConn IPM) $75,000
The University of Connecticut’s (UConn) Departments of Plant Science and Cooperative Extension will continue working with various commodity growers within the Thames River Basin and provide on-site demonstrations, individual or group meetings on proper IPM/Nutrient BMP's and conduct preside dress soil nitrate testing. Reductions in pesticide and nutrient loading will be quantified and homeowner education will be provided on sustainable turf and landscapes.
 
06-04   IPM and Nutrient Management Programs Thames River Basin Year 2 UConn $75,000
UConn will provide outreach to the various agricultural cooperators and homeowners in the Thames basin.  Provide technical information on Integrated Pest Management and nutrient BMP’s for sustainable turf and landscapes.  UConn will also work with ECCD who will focus on the nutrient management part of this project.  Besides agricultural producers, both golf course and homeowners will be a key part of their target audience.  With DEEP’s focus on the Thames basin, this will complement ongoing efforts.
 
08-02   Integrated Pest Management/Nutrient Management Project (UConn Plant Science) $75,000
The University of Connecticut’s (UConn) Departments of Plant Science and Cooperative Extension will recruit IPM/ICM project cooperators within a DEP designated priority watershed.  UConn will work in the agricultural commodities, which are present in that watershed.  This may include vegetables, fruits, greenhouse, nursery and dairy.  Education will consist of multiple on-site demonstration projects, individual or group meetings, and/or season-long consultations on proper IPM/Nutrient BMP’s.  Nutrient testing (preside dress soil nitrate tests and/or cornstalk tests) will be conducted.  Surveys will be conducted to assess pre- and post-program inputs and to quantify reductions in pesticide and nutrient loading.  Several Watershed-based Plans are currently being developed by USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service and others.  When these plans are completed, UConn will be able to work with growers in the designated watershed(s) during the 2009 field season.
 
09-02   Integrated Pest Management and Nutrient Management Demonstration Project (UConn) $69,000 - The University of Connecticut’s Departments of Plant Science and Cooperative Extension will recruit IPM/ICM project cooperators within a DEEP designated priority watershed.  We will work in the agricultural commodities, which are present in that watershed.  This may include vegetables, fruits, greenhouse, nursery and dairy.  Education will consist of multiple on-site demonstration projects, individual or group meetings, and/or season-long consultations on proper IPM/nutrient BMP’s.  Nutrient testing (presidedress soil nitrate tests and/or cornstalk tests) will be conducted.  Surveys will be conducted to assess pre- and post-program inputs and to quantify reductions in pesticide and nutrient loading.  The major watershed plans completed or near completion are the Niantic River, Coginchaug River, Little River  and Broad Brook watersheds.
 
05-05   Search (Children’s Museum of Connecticut) $45,000
Project SEARCH is a partnership between the Children’s Museum of Connecticut (formerly Science Center of Connecticut) and the CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.  SEARCH staff work with teachers statewide to collect physical, biological, chemical, and land use data from over 75 active schools, collecting data on more than 100 rivers and streams.  SEARCH staff will continue working side-by-side with students and teachers across the state to conduct a statewide river and stream monitoring and education program.
 
06-05   Project Search (Children’s Museum of Connecticut) $45,000
Project SEARCH is a partnership between the Children’s Museum of Connecticut (formerly Science Center of Connecticut) and the CT Department of Environmental Protection.  SEARCH staff work with teachers statewide to collect physical, biological, chemical, and land use data from over 75 active schools, collecting data on more than 100 rivers and streams.  SEARCH staff will continue working side-by-side with students and teachers across the state to conduct a statewide river and stream monitoring and education program.
 
07-03   Project SEARCH (Children’s Museum of Connecticut) $40,000 
Project SEARCH is a partnership between the Children’s Museum of Connecticut (formerly Science Center of Connecticut) and the CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.  SEARCH staff work with teachers statewide to collect physical, biological, chemical, and land use data from approximately 80 different schools and close to 100 stream sites each year.  SEARCH staff will continue working side-by-side with students and teachers across the state to collect baseline water quality data, including NPS potential surveys.  In addition to field assistance, SEARCH staff will distribute NPS and storm water materials provided by the EPA at workshops and trainings.  This funding will also allow for staff to offer training workshops for new teachers entering the program. When new schools join Project SEARCH, staff will guide them on site selection using the 303d list of impaired waterways.
 
08-03   Project SEARCH (Children’s Museum) $40,000
Project SEARCH is a partnership between the Children’s Museum of Connecticut (formerly Science Center of Connecticut) and the CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.  SEARCH staff work with teachers statewide to collect physical, biological, chemical, and land use data from approximately 80 different schools and close to 100 stream sites each year.  SEARCH staff will continue to work side-by-side with students and teachers across the state to collect baseline water quality data, including NPS potential surveys.  In addition to field assistance, SEARCH staff will distribute NPS and stormwater materials provided by the EPA at workshops and trainings.  This funding will also allow for staff to offer training workshops for new teachers entering the program. When new schools join Project SEARCH, staff will guide them on site selection using the 303d list of impaired waterways.

 
09-03   Project SEARCH (Children’s Museum of Connecticut) $40,000 - Project SEARCH is a partnership between the Children’s Museum of Connecticut (formerly Science Center of Connecticut) and the CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.  SEARCH staff work with teachers statewide to collect physical, biological, chemical, and land use data from approximately 80 different schools and close to 100 stream sites each year.  SEARCH staff will continue working side-by-side with students and teachers across the state to collect baseline water quality data, including NPS potential surveys.  In addition to field assistance, SEARCH staff will distribute NPS and storm water materials provided by the EPA at workshops and trainings.  This funding will also allow for staff to offer training workshops for new teachers entering the program. When new schools join Project SEARCH, staff will guide them on site selection using the 303d list of impaired waterways.
 
05-08   NPS Watershed Management Support (Connecticut Conservation Districts) $150,000
Funds divided between five Conservation Districts.  Connecticut’s five Conservation Districts will provide site plan reviews, recommendations for BMPs, management of NPS pollution and erosion and sedimentation control issues, technical assistance with watershed management planning, technical services on a watershed basis and support changes required by new regulations.   In addition, the conservation districts will assist DEEP on investigating impaired waters via intensive track down inventories and compile information into a centralized database, provide summary of impaired waters with existing data on hand and potential opportunities for investigating impairments, and survey potential stormwater retrofit projects.
 
06-08   NPS Management (Connecticut Conservation Districts) $160,000
Connecticut’s five Conservation Districts will conduct NPS assessments and provide technical reviews and on-site assistance in Connecticut’s 303(d) listed waterbodies. They will also promote practices identified in DEEP’s 2004 Stormwater Quality Manual.  Districts will assist the DEEP with water quality assessment and development of TMDLs in specific Connecticut 303(d) listed waterbodies by completing Stream Walks/Track Down Surveys.  Surveys, focusing on impairments and proposed enhancements, will be in a standard format agreed upon between the Districts and DEEP.  Information will be compiled into a database and summaries and will be provided for future reference and to use in planning improvement/implementation projects.  Using survey information, districts will work with DEEP to complete watershed protection plans and develop implementation schedules for impaired waterbodies.  Districts may choose to conduct stormwater retrofit identification and prioritization projects as an alternative, the will also investigate, identify, prioritize and report on stormwater discharges requiring retrofits to improve NPS control and prevention in impaired waterbodies in non-MS4 communities.
 
07-04   Connecticut Conservation Districts NPS Management/ Watershed Protection Planning Projects (CDs of CT)  $160,000
Divided between 5 Conservation Districts.  Connecticut’s five Conservation Districts will conduct NPS assessments and provide technical reviews and on-site assistance in Connecticut’s 303(d) listed waterbodies. They will also promote practices identified in DEEP’s 2004 Stormwater Quality Manual.  Districts will assist the DEEP with water quality assessment and development of TMDLs in specific Connecticut 303(d) listed waterbodies by completing Stream Walks/Track Down Surveys.  Surveys, focusing on impairments and proposed enhancements, will be in a standard format agreed upon between the Districts and DEEP.  Information will be compiled into a database and summaries and will be provided for future reference and to use in planning improvement/implementation projects.  Using survey information, districts will work with DEEP to complete watershed protection plans and develop implementation schedules for impaired waterbodies.  Districts may choose to conduct stormwater retrofit identification and prioritization projects as an alternative, the will also investigate, identify, prioritize and report on stormwater discharges requiring retrofits to improve NPS control and prevention in impaired waterbodies in non-MS4 communities.
 
08-04   Connecticut Conservation Districts NPS Management/ Watershed Protection Planning Projects (CDs of CT) $250,000 D
ivided between 5 Conservation Districts to total $50,000 per District.  Connecticut’s five Conservation Districts (Districts) will conduct NPS assessments and probide technical reviews and on-site assistance in Connecticut DEP priority waterbodies, and promote practices identified in DEEP’s 2004 Stormwater Quality Manual.  Districts will assist DEEP with water quality assessment and development of TMDLs in specific Connecticut 303(d) listed priority waterbodies by completing Track Down Surveys.  Surveys, focusing on impairments and proposed enhancements, will be in a standard format agreed upon between the Districts and DEEP.  Informationwill be compiled in a database and summaries will be provided for future reference and for use in planning improvment/implementaion projects.  Using survey information, Districts will work with DEEP to complewte basic watershed-based plans following EPA’s 9 element model and develop implementaiton schedules for impaired waterbodies.  Districts may choose to conduct stormwater retrofit identification and prioritization projects as an alternative.  Districts will investigate, identify, prioritixze and report on stormwater discharges requiring retrofits to improve NPS control and prevention in impaired waterbodies in non-MS4 communities.
 
09-04   Connecticut Conservation Districts NPS Management/ Watershed Protection Planning Projects ( CT CDs) $250,000 Divided between 5 Conservation Districts- Connecticut’s five Conservation Districts will initiate Watershed Base Planning Implementaion projects and provide technical reviews and on-site assistance in Connecticut’s 303(d) listed waterbodies. They will also promote practices identified in DEP’s 2004 Stormwater Quality Manual.  Districts will assist the DEP with water quality assessment and development of TMDLs in specific Connecticut 303(d) listed waterbodies by completing Stream Walks/Track Down Surveys.  Surveys, focusing on impairments and proposed enhancements, will be in a standard format agreed upon between the Districts and DEEP.  Information will be compiled into a database and summaries and will be provided for future reference and to use in planning improvement/implementation projects.  Using survey information, districts will work with DEEP to complete watershed protection plans and develop implementation schedules for impaired waterbodies.  Districts may choose to conduct stormwater retrofit identification and prioritization projects as an alternative, the will also investigate, identify, prioritize and report on stormwater discharges requiring retrofits to improve NPS control and prevention in impaired waterbodies in non-MS4 communities.
 
10-01   Connecticut Conservation Districts NPS Management/ Watershed Protection Planning Projects, (CT CDs) $250,000 Divided between 5 Conservation Districts- Connecticut’s five Districts will conduct NPS assessments and provide technical reviews and on-site assistance in Connecticut DEEP’s priority waterbodies, and promote practices identified in DEEP’s 2004 Stormwater Quality Manual.  The District will also conduct implementation/restoration projects based on recommendations in an existing Watershed-based Plan, TMDL, MS4 Stormwater Management Plan, or Track Down Survey report, or projects with similar water quality protection/improvement goals.  Final project locations will be determined in consultation with DEEP to address priority needs.  
 
07-05   CT DPH Soils Training Workshop (CT DPH) $30,000
Connecticut Department of Public Health will provide a soil training workshop to instruct local health department officials, engineers and sewage disposal system installers in clearly identifying different soil types to better determine the suitability of that soil for the design, approval and subsequent installation of subsurface sewage disposal systems (i.e., septic systems).  The soil-training project will promote thorough and consistent site investigations conducted by local health department staff and engineers as well aid in the protection of the environment.  Soils Training is a preventative measure to ensure systems are sited property.  Properly sited systems significantly reduce the likelihood of system failure and help prevent pollution of groundwater.  Properly sited systems reduce nutrient loads to the states groundwater.  Education and standardization training for local health officials and individuals who design systems is a key nonpoint source management measure.  DPH is responsible for training all new local health officials.  The Soils Workshop will provide field standardization for new local health officials.  In the future DPH plans on making this a mandatory requirement for all health officials.
 
05-02   Lake Association Capacity Building Small Grants Program (Connecticut Federation of Lakes) $20,000
The Connecticut Federation of Lakes (CFL) will develop a small grant program for Connecticut lake associations for capacity building.  The Connecticut Federation of Lakes has worked with many of the principal lake groups in the state.   Small grant funds would be utilized to for incorporation, development of a newsletter/web page, investigation/initiation of a boat inspection program, and to perform invasive species surveys. 

06-02   Lake Association Capacity Building Small Grants Yr 2 CT Federation of Lakes (CFL) $20,000
The Connecticut Federation of Lakes (CFL) will continue a small grant program for Connecticut lake associations.  The Connecticut Federation of Lakes has worked with many of the principal lake groups in the state.   However, there are many smaller lakes that have either no or only loosely developed associations.  CFL will provide a second year of capacity building small grants for lake associations.  CFL’s first priority will be small grants for lakes on the Integrated 303(d) Water List for targeted impairments.  CFL’s second priority will be for small grants for threatened lakes that are on the 305(b) list that may eventually go on 303(d).
 
08-09   Lake Association Capacity Building Small Grants Program Year 2 (CFL) $20,000
The Connecticut Federation of Lakes (CFL) will continue a small grant program for Connecticut lake associations.  The Connecticut Federation of Lakes has worked with many of the principal lake groups in the state.   However there are many smaller lakes that have either no or only loosely developed associations.    The program provides start up grant funds, of up to $3,000, for emerging lake associations or lake groups.  The specific fundable activities have been determined during the initial develop phase in 2006 and are available at the CFL website.
9-06  NPS Outreach/Misc. (DEEP) $21,000 – Provide educational outreach programs/publications to the public. Focus on nonpoint source issues across the state. Assist in National Association Lake Management Society with their symposium held in Hartford, CT (Oct. 09’).
 
05-06   Statewide Probabilistic Water Quality Survey of Connecticut Lakes Phase 3 (DEEP/Connecticut College) $90,200
Conduct limnological monitoring of 20 Connecticut lakes per year, for three years.  Water quality assessments made from this probabilistic sample will be used for 305(b) reporting and will be extrapolated for all lakes in the State.  Sampling will include nutrient and chlorophyll sediment cores and will establish current and historic trophic conditions for nutrient criteria development.
 
08-05  Opportunities/Guidelines for Protecting and Restoring Shorelines along Connecticut Lakes (DEEP) $40,000
Develop public outreach materials targeting residents of lakes and ponds across CT, as well as municipal land use officials. The materials would highlight the ecological importance of maintaining naturally vegetated shorelines (from upland terrestrial through the shoreline and including the emergent and aquatic floating leaf aquatic plant community), and perhaps more importantly, would provide technical guidance on how to restore altered shoreline habitats.
 
06-06   Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (Rivers Alliance) $25,000
This project will fund the CT Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (WASGP) for local groups working on river-watershed protection in CT, with the aim of reducing NPS pollution.  Through this program over thirty-six watershed groups have been active in source water protection from NPS pollution, water monitoring, watershed education, land resource and land use studies and education.  Continuing this successful program in 2006 will contribute significantly to improving watershed protection in CT, and reducing NPS pollution of our impaired watercourses.
 
07-06   Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (Rivers Alliance) $30,000
This application is to fund the CT Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (WASGP) for local groups working on river-watershed protection in Connecticut, with the aim of reducing NPS pollution.  Through this program over thirty-six watershed groups have been active in source water protection from NPS pollution, water monitoring, watershed education, land resource and land use studies and education.  Continuing this successful program in will contribute significantly to improving watershed protection in Connecticut, and reducing NPS pollution of our watercourses.
 
08-06   Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (Rivers Alliance) $40,000
This project will fund the CT Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (WASGP) for local groups working on river-watershed protection in CT, with the aim of reducing NPS pollution.  Through this program over thirty-six watershed groups have been active in source water protection from NPS pollution, water monitoring, watershed education, land resource and land use studies and education.  Continuing this successful program in 2008 will contribute significantly to improving watershed protection in CT, and reducing NPS pollution of our impaired watercourses.
 
09-05   Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program Year 8 (Rivers Alliance) $21,586 - This application is to fund the sixth year of the CT Watershed Assistance Small Grants Program (WASGP) for local groups working on river-watershed protection in Connecticut, with the aim of reducing NPS pollution.  Through this program over thirty-six watershed groups have been active in source water protection from NPS pollution, water monitoring, watershed education, land resource and land use studies and education.  Continuing this successful program in will contribute significantly to improving watershed protection in Connecticut as well as reducing NPS pollution of our watercourses.
 
07-07   Horse Environmental BMP Tech Service (Kings Mark RC&D) $30,000
The KMRCD, along with the Horse Environmental Awareness Program Committee (HEAP), will develop two standards (paddock and ring NPS storm water management), and provide outreach to the horse community regarding those issues, proposes to research and formalize funding opportunities, proposes to develop a job announcement for the intent, scope, qualifications and management orientation for the services of a Horse Environmental Technical Service Provider (HETSP), and proposes to define a geographic focus area for implementation based on TMDL priority areas, public water supply protection and other critical environmental focus areas.  This project is consistent with the LISS TMDL for nitrogen and statewide priority TMDL needs for nutrients and sediment.
 
09-08  Horse Environmental BMP Tech Service Phase 2, (Kings Mark RC&D) $40,000 - The KMRCD, along with the Horse Environmental Awareness Program Committee (HEAP), will develop two standards (paddock and ring NPS storm water management), and provide outreach to the horse community regarding those issues, proposes to research and formalize funding opportunities, proposes to develop a job announcement for the intent, scope, qualifications and management orientation for the services of a Horse Environmental Technical Service Provider (HETSP), and proposes to define a geographic focus area for implementation based on TMDL priority areas, public water supply protection and other critical environmental focus areas.  This project is consistent with the LISS TMDL for nitrogen and statewide priority TMDL needs for nutrients and sediment.
1. Paddock and Ring NPS Storm Water Management Demonstration Site, (UConn-Storrs Campus)
2. Horse Environmental Technical Service Provider (HETSP), (Kings Mark RC&D)
 
07-10   Integrated Pest Management and Nutrient Management Demonstration Project (UConn) $70,000 
The University of Connecticut’s Departments of Plant Science and Cooperative Extension will recruit IPM/ICM project cooperators within a DEP designated priority watershed.  We will work in the agricultural commodities, which are present in that watershed.  This may include vegetables, fruits, greenhouse, nursery and dairy.  Education will consist of multiple on-site demonstration projects, individual or group meetings, and/or season-long consultations on proper IPM/nutrient BMP’s.  Nutrient testing (pre-sidedress soil nitrate tests and/or cornstalk tests) will be conducted.  Surveys will be conducted to assess pre- and post-program inputs and to quantify reductions in pesticide and nutrient loading.  Numerous Watershed-based Plans have been completed or are currently being developed.
 
08-10   Nitrogen Fertilizer Reductions on Coastal Lawns Through Training and Education Phase 2: (UConn) $25,000 
Year 1 funded with FY07 funding.  There have been relatively few changes in fertilization practices of lawns in the past 30 years. The majority of lawncare professionals, municipal workers, and homeowners still rely on decades-old fertilization recommendations and practices where nitrogen is applied on a schedule at a set rate (usually 1 lb N/1000ft2 at each application based on holiday dates – Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving; equivalent to approximately 175 lbs N/acre/yr) rather than being based on soil nutrient availability as measured by an objective testing method. This greatly increases the chance of over-application of nitrogen that can leach or runoff into receiving waters. The primary objective of this project is to reduce nitrogen application amounts on lawns by training and educating lawncare professionals and municipal workers on: (i) the use of a nitrate soil test to guide N fertilization of lawns, (ii) changes to fall fertilization practices, (iii) use of slow-release fertilizer formulations, and (iv) use of alternative lower-input turf species. Information will be available also to homeowners. The overall objective to reduce the nitrogen load currently applied to lawns will be applicable to the statewide efforts to reduce nitrogen in meeting TMDL goals. A secondary objective is to establish demonstration turf areas showing how quality can be maintained and threats to water quality reduced with alternative, lower input turf species and changes to fertilization practices.  It is expected that a 30 to 50% reduction in fertilizer amounts applied to lawns can be achieved with successful implementation of this project.
 
05-12   Alternative Technologies Using Agricultural Manures Phase 2 (RC&D/NRCS/DEEP) $118,867
Based on a feasibility report and recommendations developed under FY04 funding to identify appropriate technologies and methods for converting surplus manure into an energy producing and bio-available product, this funding will support implementation of one or more manure utilization project(s).  Implementation will include community outreach, farmer outreach, and farmer education.
 
07-11   Dairy Manure Composting (Eastern Connecticut Resource Conservation & Development) ($144,796 FY-07 and $115,204 FY-08 = $260,000)
Phase 1 of this effort is the report “North Canaan Nutrient Management Feasibility Study,” completed by Wright-Pierce 2006. The report identified alternative composting strategies and their costs to the farms to compost up to 148 Tons/day.  Phase 2 will implement a partial composting facility for 36 tons per day of dairy manure and bulking agent.  The composting facility will include a building to contain compost windrows with turning equipment, a curing pad, and tarps with anchors to cover the curing piles and finished compost. Phase 2A (2007) will construct the composting building and floor and purchase a screener. Phase 2B (2008) will install a curing pad, purchase a windrow turner, operate and maintain the facility for 1 year and prepare an economic summary of the costs and returns.
 
09-10  Phase 3 - North Canaan Nutrient Management – Dairy Manure Nutrient Removal System (Eastern Connecticut Resource Conservation & Development) $130,000 ($144,796 FY-07 and $115,204 FY-08 = $260,000) - Phase 3 – Nutrient Removal System - will install a nutrient removal system to concentrate nutrients in the manure solids. These manure solids will be composted and removed off the farm through compost sales. The primary benefit of this system includes reducing the possibility of over fertilizing fields, which is a potential source of pollution in the Housatonic River Watershed. The objective of the project is to remove over 75 % of the manure phosphorous, about 75,336 pounds of phosphorous per year, from their 900 head dairy farm.
 
10-12  Converting Dairy Manure Fiber into Plant Growing Media as a Nutrient Removal Strategy, (Eastern CT Resource Conservation & Development) $70,000 – This project will determine the viability of using dairy manure fiber, a byproduct of anaerobic digestion, in growing media for commercial plant production. Fibers and associated nutrients would be removed from dairy farms and used by plant growers as a sustainable alternative to peat in potting mixes, thus reducing nonpoint source nutrients from farmland watersheds.  Building on research done at Washington State University, trials using digestate fiber based potting mixes to grow annuals, perennials and woody plants will be conducted at commercial greenhouse and nursery sites under the supervision of the University of Connecticut.  Digestate dairy fibers from different farms will be tested periodically to assess variation in nutrient, pathogen, weeds and pH characteristics.
 
07-15   Nitrogen Fertilizer Reductions on Coastal lawns Through Training and Education Yr. 1 (UConn) $50,000 
There have been relatively few changes in fertilization practices of lawns in the past 30 years. The majority of lawncare professionals, municipal workers, and homeowners still rely on decades-old fertilization recommendations and practices where nitrogen is applied on a schedule at a set rate (usually 1 lb N/1000ft2 at each application based on holiday dates – Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving; equivalent to approximately 175 lbs N/acre/yr) rather than being based on soil nutrient availability as measured by an objective testing method. This greatly increases the chance of over-application of nitrogen that can leach or runoff into receiving waters. The primary objective of this project is to reduce nitrogen application amounts on lawns by training and educating lawncare professionals and municipal workers on: (i) the use of a nitrate soil test to guide N fertilization of lawns, (ii) changes to fall fertilization practices, (iii) use of slow-release fertilizer formulations, and (iv) use of alternative lower-input turf species. Information will be available also to homeowners. The overall objective to reduce the nitrogen load currently applied to lawns will be applicable to the statewide efforts to reduce nitrogen in meeting TMDL goals. A secondary objective is to establish demonstration turf areas showing how quality can be maintained and threats to water quality reduced with alternative, lower input turf species and changes to fertilization practices.  It is expected that a 30 to 50% reduction in fertilizer amounts applied to lawns can be achieved with successful implementation of this project.
 
05-19   Statewide Watershed-Based Planning $146,308
EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place (preferably for impaired waters).  The 9 elements of a watershed-based plan include the following:
1. Identify causes and sources of impairment
2. Estimate expected load reductions
3. Describe needed NPS management measures
4. Estimate needed technical and financial assistance
5. Public information and education
6. Implementation schedule for NPS management measures
7. Measurable milestones
8. Performance criteria
9. Monitoring Plan
Funding was provided to complete production of a Watershed Based Plan in the Coginchaug River Watershed.
 
06-09   DEP Statewide Watershed Base Planning/Implementation in Impaired waters (DEEP) $486,661
EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place (preferably for impaired waters).  The 9 elements of a watershed-based plan include the following:
1. Identify causes and sources of impairment
2. Estimate expected load reductions
3. Describe needed NPS management measures
4. Estimate needed technical and financial assistance
5. Public information and education
6. Implementation schedule for NPS management measures
7. Measurable milestones
8. Performance criteria
9. Monitoring Plan
 
Funding is being provided to initiate production and implementation of Watershed Based Plans in the following watersheds:
1. Broad Brook Watershed Based Management Plan Development, NRCS, $78,000.  This project will address nonpoint source pollution in the Broad Brook watershed by producing a guidance and planning document regarding land uses and pollution reduction within the watershed.  NRCS will develop a watershed based plan and will identify the nine elements of that plan.
2. Little River Watershed Based Management Plan Development, NRCS, $72,000.  This project will address nonpoint source pollution in the Little River watershed by producing a guidance and planning document regarding land uses and pollution reduction within the watershed.  NRCS will develop a watershed based plan and will identify the nine elements of that plan.
3. Broad Brook Outreach, NRCS, $12,000. The watershed management plan project will be explained to local municipalities and community readiness will be assessed through targeted public outreach.  An “ad hoc” watershed committee will be established and a local contact/municipal representative will be identified for each community to work with NRCS through the watershed committee.  NRCS will meet with local community members and groups to identify community concerns in order to help tailor the project to meet community interests as well as NRCS and DEEP objectives.  Local community members will participate in mapping verification exercises to confirm land use/land cover data information and local volunteers will be recruited to participate in the stream walk.  NRCS will present the watershed assessment report and findings to local community members.
4. Little River Outreach, ECCD, $12,000.  The watershed management plan project will be explained to local municipalities and community readiness will be assessed through targeted public outreach.  An “ad hoc” watershed committee will be established and a local contact/municipal representative will be identified for each community to work with NRCS through the watershed committee.  NRCS will meet with local community members and groups to identify community concerns in order to help tailor the project to meet community interests as well as NRCS and DEEP objectives.  Local community members will participate in mapping verification exercises to confirm land use/land cover data information and local volunteers will be recruited to participate in the stream walk.  NRCS will present the watershed assessment report and findings to local community members.
5. Steele Brook/Watertown Watershed Based Plan, NRCS, $98,000.  NRCS will assist DEEP and the Town of Watertown in developing an effective Watershed Based Plan for the Steele Brook Watershed.  Steele Brook is on the list of Connecticut waterbodies not meeting Water Quality Standards.  DEEP has determined that removal of the Heminway Dam will improve water quality in a 3.7 mile segment of this stream and assist in ultimate removal of this segment from the 303(d) list for iron precipitate.  This project develops a Steele Brook WBP to also work toward implementation of measures to remove the above stream segment and the downstream segment from the impaired list for indicator bacteria.  Feasible options for the removal of Heminway Dam and for stream corridor improvements from Pin Shop Pond to Route 6 will be evaluated and documented in the WBP.
6. Eagleville Brook Cover Based TMDL, UConn, $200,000.  This project seeks to support the impervious cover-based TMDL for Eagleville Brook, a 303(d) listed waterbody and FY08 priority waterbody for the CT Nonpoint Source Program.  GIS data collection, field surveys, and expert discussions will be combined to determine specific methods by which the UConn and Mansfield communities can address the TMDL, and monitor progress toward the TMDL goals, through a watershed-based management plan.
 
07-09   DEEP Watershed Based Planning Efforts (DEEP/Others) $225,000
EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place. (Preferably for impaired waters).  The 9 elements of a watershed-based plan include the following:
  1. Identify causes and sources of impairment
  2. Estimate expected load reductions
  3. Describe needed NPS management measures
  4. Estimate needed technical and financial assistance
  5. Public information and education
  6. Implementation schedule for NPS management measures
  7. Measurable milestones
  8. Performance criteria
  9. Monitoring Plan
Funding is provided to initiate production of Watershed Based Plans in the following watersheds:
    1. Mattabesset - Willow Brook Porous Asphalt Pavement System, Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, $75,000.  This project is a porous asphalt retrofit of an approximately 30,000 square foot gravel parking lot in the City of New Britain’s Willow Brook Park.  It will be the first porous asphalt parking lot to be made in Connecticut.  This undertaking is part of a larger collaborative effort between New Britain,  the Conservation District and DEEP to improve water quality and address TMDL implementation in the Willow Brook sub regional basin. 
    2. Mattabesset/Coginchaug – Pet Waste Management at Wadsworth Falls State Park, Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, $15,000.  This project will address a need identified in the draft Coginchaug River Watershed-based Plan produced by USDA NRCS.  The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District will work with DEEP to plan and implement a pet waste management project at Wadsworth Falls State Park. The management project will include purchase and installation of all—in-one pet waste stations, production of educational signs and materials, and outreach in the park and outside of the park at pet-related businesses and veterinarian offices. 
    3. Hockanum  - Watershed Management Plan Implementation for Storm water Retrofit, North Central Conservation District, $75,000.  The District completed a Watershed Management plan for storm water retrofits within the Hockanum River watershed.  Two high priority sites on Olcott and St. John Street’s were identified for construction of storm water retrofits.  The town staff will complete engineering and oversee construction activities for retrofits.
    4. Niantic – Nutrient, bacteria and stream flow monitoring in the Niantic River Watershed, U.S. Geological Survey, $50,000.  Phase1 of a proposed three phase project.  The USGS will install stream flow gages on the Niantic River tributaries and begin to collect continuous stream information.  The site locations include Latimer Brook, Oil Mill Brook, and Stony Brook.  The USGS will collect monthly samples at all three stations to be analyzed for nutrients, indicator bacteria and field parameters.  An additional three high-flow samples will be collected at each site. 
    5. Quinnipiac – Wharton Brook Sediment Forebay, DEEP, $67,000.  Previous 319 grant monies were used to design a sedimentation forebay and dredge project for Allan Brook Pond.  This pond is listed on the impaired waterbody list and the swim beach is frequently closed due to high E. Coli counts.  This project is designed to increase the volume of water and the turnover rate in the pond, reduce sediment load to the pond and improve the water quality.
    6. Five Mile River – Watershed Based Management Plan Development, City of Norwalk, $33,000.  This project will address nonpoint source pollution in the Five Mile River watershed by producing a guidance and planning document regarding land uses and pollution reduction within the watershed.  The city will develop a watershed base plan and will identify the nine elements of that plan.
 
09-07  DEEP Watershed Base Planning Efforts (DEEP/Others) $350,000 - EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place. (Preferably for impaired waters). 
This project will provide funding for proposed watershed base plans implementation projects to ultimately achieve measurable results with goal of delisting water body from 303(d) listing. Eligible watershed base plans will include but not be limited to the Coginchaug River Watershed, Niantic River Watershed, and the Tankerhoosen River Watershed. These watersheds have completed watershed based plans.

 
 
Connecticut River Basin
 
05-09   NPS Visual Identification, Prioritization, and Recommendations (CRCCD) $20,000
The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District will conduct stream surveys and coordinate and train volunteers to support DEEP’s needs for identifying NPS pollution problems.  This project will include developing solutions and providing, if necessary, additional monitoring of agricultural NPS pollution in the Mattabesset regional basin, including the Coginchaug subregional basin.
 
06-10   NPS Watershed Based Plan - Coginchaug Outreach (CRCCD) $20,000
The CRCCD will assist CT DEEP and NRCS in the outreach portion of the Watershed Based Planning efforts in the Cognichaug watershed.  CRCCD will enhance NRCS efforts by coordinating outreach and education efforts with the local communities, contributing an extensive database of information built up over the past 14 years, and assisting in identifying sources of impairments through its established “track down survey” program.
 
10-03  Coordinate Implementation of the Coginchaug River Watershed-based Plan with a part-time staff Watershed Coordinator, (CRCCD)  $22,000 - The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District proposes to coordinate implementation of the Coginchaug River Watershed-based Plan with a part-time staff Watershed Coordinator.  The Watershed Coordinator will coordinate activities of the Coginchaug River Watershed-based Plan Implementation Committee; generate local/stakeholder interest and participation in implementing the plan through coalition-building; and develop an actionable list of priority implementation projects. Additionally, in coordination with DEEP and EPA and using science-based decision-making, the Watershed Coordinator will develop a strategy for efficiently and effectively de-listing impaired segments to guide and prioritize implementation efforts.
 
08-11   Water Quality Monitoring in the Coginchaug River in Support of a Watershed Based Plan (USGS) $18,000
USGS would collect water-quality samples at their gaging station on the Coginchaug River in Rockfall Connecticut.  Samples would be collected for a two-year period for the following constituents.  Nutrients, e. coli bacteria, field measurements (15 times per year), major ions, and trace metals would be collected 8 times per year.  This data collection would be used in a report for the 3rd year of the study.  This data collection would provide support for the watershed-based plan recently developed by the NRCS.  It would also provide information on nutrient loads, and trace metal concentrations in the watershed, to help identify other impairments.  This request is for the first year of a 3-year study.
 
09-09  Water-quality monitoring in the Coginchaug River in Support of a Watershed Based Plan, (USGS) $12,515 - The USGS would collect water-quality samples at our gauging station on the Coginchaug River in Rockfall Connecticut.  Samples would be collected for a two-year period for the following constituents.  Nutrients, e. coli bacteria, field measurements (15 times per year), major ions, and trace metals would be collected 8 times per year.  This data collection would be used in a report for the 3rd year of the study.  This data collection would provide support for the watershed based plan recently developed by the NRCS.  It would also provide information on nutrient loads, and trace metal concentrations in the watershed, to help identify other impairments.EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place. (Preferably for impaired waters).
 
10-04  Water-quality monitoring in the Coginchaug River in Support of a Watershed Based Plan, (USGS) $8,176 - USGS will collect water-quality samples at the gaging stations on the Coginchaug River in Rockfall, Connecticut.  Samples would be collected for the following constituents:  Nutrients, e. coli bacteria, field measurements (15 times per year), major ions, and trace metals (8 times per year).  This data collection would be used in a report for the 3rd year of the study and will provide support for the watershed based plan recently developed by NRCS.  It would also provide information on nutrient loads, and trace metal concentrations in the watershed, to help identify other impairments.  This request is for the third year of a 3-year study, and will cover the sampling period from October 2010-September 2011.
 
10-05  Tankerhoosen Watershed Management Plan Implementation Project, (NCCD) $50,000 – This project includes construction of a bioretention area at the Lake Street School in Vernon.  This proposed storm water retrofit will serve a high-traffic parking area at the school, reducing storm water discharges and pollutant loads to the Tankerhoosen River.  The project was recommended by the Tankerhoosen River Watershed Management Plan, a plan that meets EPA’s nine elements for watershed planning, as a potential retrofit opportunity.
 
10-06  Bigelow Brook Stormwater Retrofit, (NCCD) $70,000 - An existing detention pool will be modified and expanded into a functional stormwater pond.  The pool will be lined with riprap, and the banks of the storm water channel leading into Bigelow Brook will be stabilized.  Excessive erosion and sedimentation will be decreased and sediment storage within the pond will be increased.  This project was ranked as high priority within the Manchester Hockanum Watershed Based Plan prepared by NCCD.
 
Housatonic River Basin
 
08-12   North Canaan Nutrient Management - Dairy Manure Composting Phase 2: (Eastern Connecticut RC&D) Proposed $260,000 ($144,796 FY-07 and $115,204 FY-08).  Funded 1st year at $144,796. 
Phase 1 of this effort is the report “North Canaan Nutrient Management Feasibility Study,” completed by Wright-Pierce 2006. The report identified alternative composting strategies and their costs to the farms to compost up to 148 Tons/day.  Phase 2 will implement a composting facility for 36 tons per day of dairy manure and bulking agent.  The composting facility will include a building to contain compost windrows with turning equipment. Phase 2A (2007) will construct the composting building. Phase 2B (2008) will install a building to store the finished compost, and a tipping shed to store any bulking agent or other compostable materials delivered to the site, operate and maintain the facility for 1 year and prepare an  economic summary of the costs and returns.
 
06-11   Evaluation of Eutrophication Effects in Lake Lillinonah, Lake Lillinonah Authority (LLA) $30,000
In lake and watershed data collection of nutrients, temperature, DO, and phytoplankton to determine blue-green algae bloom formation dynamics.  This project will serve to continue existing lake eutrophication studies begun in 2002, following USGS nutrient and hydrologic load modeling.  This information will assist DEEP with the development of a TMDL for Lake Lillinonah.
 
08-13   Watershed and In-lake Water Quality Monitoring of Hatch Pond, Kent (Town of Kent) $15,000
Watershed and Water Quality Monitoring of Hatch pond in South Kent, shall consist of sampling tributaries to and outlet from Hatch Pond for phosphorous, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and total Kjeldahl nitrogen.  Also monitoring and analyses for hydrologic and nutrient loading and Sampling for existing seasonal trends in the biology, chemistry, and the physical conditions.  This shall be done in a manner to be consistent with the monitoring and analyses work previously done in past few years.
 
08-08   DEP Watershed Base Planning Efforts (DEEP)
WBP/Implementation Steele Brook Watertown, CT $126,600 Mini priority WBP planning/implementation efforts TBD, including $48,199 for Steele Brook - This project will complete the detailed design for the selected option; possibly, either a partial breach of the dam spillway and a natural channel design of the side drainage way around the west and north sides of the pond or a full breach of the dam spillway and natural channel design through the sediments above the dam to the upstream end of the pool and stability analysis of the stream to Route 6.  Also, the Town of Watertown has recently acquired the dam and pond from Sieman’s Company and will acquire any additional land rights and permits to construct the project.
 
EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place. (Preferably for impaired waters).  The 9 elements of a watershed-based plan include the following:
  1. Identify causes and sources of impairment
  2. Estimate expected load reductions
  3. Describe needed NPS management measures
  4. Estimate needed technical and financial assistance
  5. Public information and education
  6. Implementation schedule for NPS management measures
  7. Measurable milestones
  8. Performance criteria
  9. Monitoring Plan
 
South Western Coastal Basin
 
05-11   Water Quality Monitoring Byram (Interstate Environmental Commission) $10,000
Sampling on the Byram River has shown elevated levels of bacteria, which cause a general health hazard and prevent the safe use of the river for bathing, fishing, and shellfishing.  Utilizing a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP), the IEC will continue monitoring for bacterial contamination entering the river and identifying the potential sources. 
 
08-14   Byram Watershed Coalition (Southwest Conservation District) $30,000
This project will develop a watershed based plan.  The funding will be used to build the capacity, and create the plan.  Goals will include specific best management practices designed to reduce bacteria loading into the Byram River.  The purpose of the Byram Watershed Coalition forum is not only to create the watershed plan, but also to facilitate ongoing collaboration and implementation.  The central goal of the forum is to address and mitigate water quality impairments in a consensus-driven interstate watershed based planning and implementation process.
 
08-15   Greater Bridgeport Area Watershed Based Plan (City of Bridgeport) $89,500
The City of Bridgeport will lead an effort to partner with the towns of Monroe and Trumbull to develop a region-wide Watershed Based Plan (WBP) focusing on the three towns.  Town leadership have met and agreed to such a need for a WBP, especially in light of health issues associated geese droppings in local waterbodies and other health hazards elicited by the recent flood in April 2007.  A three-town leadership committee will be formed to provide project stewardship.  The committee will hire an environmental consultant to create the plan by working with community stakeholders and each city’s staff, as well as perform surveying, research, testing and analysis.
 
08-16   Preparation of Watershed Based Plan to Address TMDL Classification (Town of Westport) $20,000
The Town of Westport Sasco Brook Pollution Abatement Committee will initiate a Sasco Brook Watershed Based Planning effort to pull together the 15 years of water quality sampling data that exists for the Brook, highlight the progress and efforts made by the Town in addressing the problems and outline our future goals and objectives. The plan would include the nine (9) required elements by the EPA.
 
05-10   Coastal TMDL Monitoring – Saugatuck River (Earthplace) $20,000
Earthplace will provide seasonal water quality baselines through weekly sampling of indicator bacteria (fecal coliform and E. coli), dissolved 02, and conductivity at 18 sampling sites in the Saugatuck River Watershed.  The source of bacteria input will be determined to the extent possible from both point and nonpoint sources and possible BMPs will be defined to reduce polluting sources.
 
06-12   Coastal TMDL Monitoring - Saugatuck River (Earthplace) $10,000
Earthplace will provide seasonal water quality baselines through weekly sampling of indicator bacteria (fecal coliform and E. coli), dissolved 02, and conductivity at 18 sampling sites in the Saugatuck River Watershed.  The source of bacteria input will be determined to the extent possible from both point and nonpoint sources and possible BMPs will be defined to reduce polluting sources.
 
08-17   A study of E. coli Bacteria Values in the Pequonnock River (EarthPlace, The Nature Discovery Center) (year 1 $15K)
EarthPlace propose a two-year study of E. coli bacteria, dissolved oxygen (D.O.), conductivity and water temperature at 10 monitoring sites along the length of the Pequonnock River.  Test will be taken every two weeks during both annual periods.  The river has been divided into 5 segments from River-01 in Monroe to River005 in Bridgeport.  Two testing sites will be located in each segment.
 
09-11  A Study of E. coli Bacteria Values in the Pequonnock River (second year), Earth Place, $5,000- Harbor Watch/ River Watch (HW/RW) a program of Earthplace in Westport, CT will undertake another one year study of E. coli bacteria, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity and water temperature at 10 monitoring sites along the length of the Pequonnock River (Figure 1). The first-year study will begin on May 1st, 2009 and will end on September 30th, 2009. The second year study will be conducted during the same period in 2010.  Water quality monitoring will be conducted twice each month during the period. The river has been divided into 5 segments from River-01 in Monroe to River -05 in Bridgeport. Two monitoring sites will be located in each segment.
 
07-12   Goose Management Project, Norwalk River Watershed (Southwest Conservation District) $42,786
This project addresses nonpoint source pollution in the Norwalk River Watershed by focusing on one contributor, the non-migratory Canada goose, a source of E. coli bacteria.  The Norwalk River Watershed Initiative will train volunteers and municipal staff to implement management activities, such as public education to inform residents that geese should not be fed, addling and/or oiling eggs with the aim of reducing the number of resident Canada geese in this watershed.  The project’s goals are:  1) to reduce the number of geese eggs hatching each year; 2) to control the prevalence of geese in the watershed; and 3) to improve water quality.  Towns that are members of the Watershed Initiative will be involved; towns in the Saugatuck River Watershed will also be encouraged to participate.
 
10-08  River Monitoring, (Earthplace-Harbor Watch/River Watch) $15,000 - One year study of E. coli bacteria, dissolved oxygen (D.O), conductivity and water temperature at 10 monitoring sites along the length of a river (5 Mile River). Tests will be taken every two weeks during a set monitoring period.
 
 
Thames/Pawcatuck/South Eastern Coastal Basins
 
05-13   Mount Hope River Riparian and Stream Habitat Restoration Phase 2 (DEEP Fisheries/NRCS)  $32,000
Agricultural practices along an approximate 1000 linear foot section of the Mount Hope River in Ashford have resulted in the alteration of a forested riparian zone.  Devegetation of the riparian zone has created several nonpoint source pollution problems including severe streambank erosion, stream sedimentation, channel instability and overwidening, water quality impairment, and degradation of instream habitat for aquatic organisms.  Following an engineering/design phase, this project will restore and stabilize over 1,000 feet of stream channel and riparian habitat, control cattle access through fencing, restore instream habitat for fish and improve water quality, and incorporate soil bioengineering and geomorphology techniques into restoration design and construction.
 
05-15   Muddy River, Little River, North Running Brook, and Roseland Lake Water Quality Improvement Initiative Phase 2 Quinebaug WS Mgmt Plan (ECCD) $60,000
This project will continue a water quality improvement initiative funded by a FY 04 319 grant focusing on the Quinebaug River and tributaries above West Thompson Lake upstream of Putnam. The FY 05 proposal will continue this effort upstream of Putnam in a second geographical area in Woodstock including Muddy Brook, Little River, North Running Brook, and Roseland Lake.  The project will include field observations and GIS mapping of land uses affecting water quality, with the goal of coordinating findings with data collected by the USGS.  The project will include evaluation and follow up on an earlier 208 report, initiation of activities to abate NPS pollution, reduction of geese nutrient additions, coordination with other local efforts, and education and outreach.  One of the products of this effort will be a watershed management plan, which will help accomplish the goals of improving water quality and removing watercourses from the Impaired Waters List.
 
08-18   Mashamoquet Brook Water Quality Improvement (ECCD) $36,000
The Mashamoquet Brook is an impaired water about which little is known.  The brook includes a diversion to a swimming pond in Mashamoquet State Park, which experiences closures due to E. coli, and there are likely other NPS pollutants impacting the brook.  The Eastern Connecticut Conservation District (ECCD) will thoroughly investigate the brook and its issues, and draft a Watershed Based Plan.  Included in the plan will be prioritized implementation actions, and one of the goals of this project will be to initiate the highest priority actions.
 
05-14   Thames River Basin Partnership (TRBP) Coordinator (ECCD) $25,664
The TRBP will hire a coordinator to provide technical and administrative support to the Partnership and work to implement the Plan of Work.  The coordinator will facilitate inter-agency and inter-municipal cooperation as plan recommendations are implemented, direct the public outreach program to educate the public about the watershed and its major issues, disseminate information to the public through outreach materials, and facilitate nonpoint source activities and projects in support of the TRBP mission to reduce NPS pollution in the Thames River basin.

06-13   Thames River Basin Partnership Coordinator, 2nd year (ECCD) $21,000
Provide second year funding for the TRBP Coordinator.  The coordinator will facilitate inter-agency and inter-municipal cooperation as plan recommendations are implemented, direct the public outreach program to educate the public about the watershed and its major issues, disseminate information to the public through outreach materials, and facilitate nonpoint source activities and projects in support of the TRBP mission to reduce NPS pollution in the Thames River basin.
 
07-13   Thames River Basin Partnership (TRBP) Coordinator (Eastern Connecticut Conservation District) $23,000
The mission of the TRBP is to improve water quality and protect natural resources within the Thames River watershed.  The Coordinator will provide technical and administrative support to the Partnership and work to implement the Plan of Work; facilitate inter-agency and inter-municipal cooperation as plan recommendations are implemented; direct the public outreach program to educate the public about the watershed and its major issues; disseminate information to the public through outreach materials; and facilitate nonpoint source activities and projects.
 
07-14   Gant Plaza Green Roof Project (UConn) $50,000
A recent TMDL for Eagleville Brook has cited problems associated with excess stormwater as the likely cause of the impairments in the Brook.  The first phase of this project is to install and monitor a green roof on a portion Gant Plaza at the University of Connecticut.  Green roofs have been shown to significantly reduce the volume of runoff leaving a roof.  The second phase of the project is to evaluate in detail the Eagleville Brook watershed (above the point where the brook daylights on the south side of North Eagleville road), to determine suitable locations for disconnection of impervious areas and installation of bioretention.
 
05-16   French River, Thompson Riparian Buffer, (NRCS) $40,230
NRCS will work with the town of Thompson to install riparian buffers on public land along a 2000 foot section of the French River in North Grosvenor Dale.  NRCS will complete the site surveys and buffer designs, as well as provide quality oversight during installation.  Additionally, two riparian buffer workshops will be conducted for other area towns and interested residents.  The town will be responsible for any land rights or permits needed, locating funding for the plants, and the installation and maintenance of the buffers.
 
05-17   Thames Project Series, (USGS) $76,000
This multi-objective project will assist in the development of a nutrient TMDL for West Thompson Lake in Thompson, CT.  The first project focuses on determining whether phosphorus is limiting algal growth in the lake.  The project goal is to develop a conceptual model of phosphorus cycling in West Thompson Lake. The second project will estimate daily and seasonal stream nutrient loads to West Thompson Lake in the Quinebaug River Basin.  Nutrient TMDL development for West Thompson Lake requires annual and seasonal nutrient budgets.  Information on how nutrient concentrations vary with short-term streamflow variations is needed to determine whether standard load estimation techniques provide an accurate estimate of stream nutrient loads delivered to West Thompson Lake.    Information from continuous monitoring over a range of streamflow conditions will improve or validate estimates of nutrient loads from the Quinebaug River.  A Previous study by the USGS and DEEP suggests that an internal load of phosphorus stored in lakebed sediments could be released to the overlying water during stratification events. This study would also examine the percent of phosphorus in the lakebed sediments that is exchangeable during anoxic events and if the recycling of phosphorus from lakebed sediments contributes a large amount of additional phosphorus to the reservoir and points downstream. 
 
06-15   Thames Project Series Nutrient Control and Algal Dynamics in West Thompson Lake Support TMDL Calculation, (USGS) $15,722
This multi-objective project will assist in the development of a nutrient TMDL for West Thompson Lake in Thompson, CT.  The first project is the Estimation of Daily and Seasonal Stream Nutrient Loads to West Thompson Lake in the Quinebaug River Basin.  The second component of the project is to examine the role of internal sources of phosphorus in the lake and how those internal sources contribute to phosphorus cycling within West Thompson Lake during periods of summer stratification.
 
07-16   Spaulding Pond Water Quality Improvement (Eastern Connecticut Conservation District) $35,000
Spaulding Pond is the centerpiece of Mohegan Park, a popular public park located in the town of Norwich, Connecticut.  The pond has a public swimming beach and the town has taken significant steps to address water quality issues, including the operation of three aeration fountains in the pond.  However, E. coli counts have caused swimming area closures and the pond has been listed on the 303 (d) List as impaired for recreation.  The TMDL priority is high.  ECCD proposes to investigate the problem, confirm the source (potential source is waterfowl), and pursue remedies, with the goal being to improve the water quality, ensure recreational use, and remove Spaulding Pond from the 303 (d) List.  The Norwich Department of Public Works and the Norwich Department of Recreation have both expressed that they would be supportive of a project that will address the water quality problem in Spaulding Pond.
 
05-18   Jordan Cove Urban Watershed National Monitoring (UConn) $100,000
The Jordan Cove Urban Watershed Project is located in Southeast Connecticut in the Town of Waterford.  The overall project was designed to develop a comparison between a traditional subdivision and a subdivision utilizing best management practices for pollution prevention.  The sotrmwater runoff from both watershed s was compared to that of a nearby residential control.  The emphasis for this last year of a 10-year national monitoring project will be on data analysis and educational outreach. This will include the development of a brief (20 - 30 minute) PowerPoint presentation focused on the project design, challenges, results, and conclusions. A multi-media CD on the project will be prepared to summarize research results and will include video clips of interviews with project principals (both researchers, town officials and residents) for distribution to all CT municipalities and other interested parties.  Last, an enhanced web site on the project will be created, using the graphic elements and information assembled for the PowerPoint presentation and multi-media CD.
 
06-14   Reduce Farm Field Nutrients Equipment (ECCD) $57,000
Reduce nutrient loading into the Little River Watershed through the introduction of equipment that incorporates manure into the soil as it is spread.   Several segments in the watershed have been on the impaired waters list for many years with one primary sources of impairment identified as agriculture.   The project will acquire the equipment, educate local dairy farmers about its use and applicability on their lands, and make the equipment available for no cost to use in place of surface spreaders on fields, which have the highest impact on water quality.
 
09-12  Nutrient,  Bacteria, and Streamflow Monitoring in the Niantic River Watershed-Year 2, USGS, $40,000- The U.S. Geological Survey will continue to collect water quality and continuous stream flow data on 3 Niantic River tributaries. The site locations include Latimer Brook (full gage with real-time information, and published record), Oil Mill Brook, and Stony Brook (Gages with unpublished record, and lower-cost equipment).  Water-quality samples will be collected monthly from October 2009-September 2010.  An additional 3 samples will be collected during storm events in order to get a wider range of flow conditions. Samples will be analyzed for Nutrients and e. coli bacteria.
 
10-11  Nutrient, Bacteria and Streamflow Monitoring in the Niantic River Watershed-Year 3, (USGS) $54,000 - U.S. Geological Survey will continue to collect water quality and continuous streamflow data on 3 Niantic River tributaries. The site locations include Latimer Brook (full gage with real-time information, and published record), Oil Mill Brook, and Stony Brook (Gages with unpublished record, and lower-cost equipment).  Water-quality samples will be collected monthly from October 2010-September 2011.  An additional samples may be collected during storm events in order to get a wider range of flow conditions. Samples will be analyzed for Nutrients and e. coli bacteria.  Funding for this proposal would cover the cost of this project from October 2010 to September 30, 2011.  The longer term goal of the nutrient sampling is to be able to routinely calculate nutrient loads, and evaluate water quality trends in nutrients and bacteria, relative to proposed reduction targets. Having available water quality data will allow for comparison with benthic assessments for these tributaries.  This proposal includes costs to write a short report on the results of this study in 2011-2012.  This is a 3rd year of a multi-year data-collection effort.
 
09-14  Watershed Based Plan Implementation - Niantic River Coordinator, Eastern Connecticut Conservation District, $28,000- A Watershed Based Plan was developed for the Niantic River through a project facilitated by DEEP (OLISP) and funded by NOAA.  It was determined that a Coordinator was needed to move the plan forward and implement the NPS abatement recommendations of the plan.  The Eastern Connecticut Conservation District was contracted to provide staff for this purpose.
 
10-10  Watershed Based Plan Implementation - Niantic River Coordinator, (Eastern Connecticut Conservation District) $25,000 - A Watershed Based (WBP) Plan was developed for the Niantic River through a project facilitated by DEEP (OLISP) and funded by NOAA.  It was determined that a Coordinator was needed to move the plan forward and implement the Nonpoint Source abatement recommendations of the plan.  The Eastern Connecticut Conservation District was contracted to provide staff for this purpose.  This application is for the third year of Coordinator services.  ECCD will continue to allot up to 20% of ECCD technical staff time, and additional contracted professional services as necessary to perform the tasks necessary to implement the WBP.
 
09-13  Development of a Watershed Based Plan for Crandall Pond, Town of Tolland, $10,000- Crandall Pond, the Town of Tolland’s only swimming area, suffers from high bacteria counts from NPS pollutants. We propose to investigate the potential sources and develop a Watershed Based Management Plan which would include a list of potential actions which could be implemented to help solve the problem.
 
10-09  Amos Lake Water Quality Improvement, (Eastern Connecticut Conservation District) $54,000 - Evaluate the existing conditions and the influences to Amos Lake, prepare an abbreviated Watershed Based Plan, and monitoring the existing condition of the lake.  ECCD will coordinate its efforts with the Amos Lake Association, and other key stakeholders.  ECCD will also coordinate with appropriate municipal officials, including Preston’s Inland Wetlands Commission, Conservation Commission, Town Planner, Sanitarian, and Groton Utilities, which has identified the watershed as a potential future drinking water supply.  The impairment causes at Amos Lake are listed as algae and nutrients, and the suspected sources are waterfowl and on-site septic systems.  Further investigation will document the problems and seek remedies to remediate the problems. 
 
South Central Coastal Basin
 
10-07  Quinnipiac River Completion of Watershed Based Plan, CT DEEP/other $50,000  - Revise and update Watershed Action Plan
 - EPA is requiring that all new 319 implementation projects have a watershed-based plan in-place. (Preferably for impaired waters).  The 9 elements of a watershed-based plan include the following:
(a) Identify causes and sources of impairment
(b) Estimate expected load reductions
(c) Describe needed NPS management measures
(d) Estimate needed technical and financial assistance                    
(e) Public information and education
(f) Implementation schedule for NPS management measures
(g) Measurable milestones
(h) Performance criteria
(i) Monitoring plan
 
This project will provide funding for proposed watershed base plans implementation projects to ultimately achieve measurable results with goal of eventually delisting a segment of water body from 303(d) listing.