DEEP: Firewood from Urban Trees

Urban Wood Utilization in Connecticut:
Firewood
 
 
Firewood can be a great outlet for wood generated by the removal and pruning of urban trees.
 
The official measure for the sale of firewood is the cord. A cord is defined as a stack of wood that measures 4 feet high by 4 feet deep by 8 feet long.  Since most firewood is not sold or used in 4 foot lengths, an alternative way to say that is that a cord equates to 128 cubic feet of stacked firewood and may include wood, bark and air. Wood may also be sold in fractions of a cord.  For instance, a standard half cord measures 64 cubic feet of stacked firewood.
  {Firewood}
Firewood is sold by the cord.  A cord is defined as 128 cubic feet of stacked wood - and can include wood, bark and air.  (How to Buy Firewood)
 
Firewood is usually sold 'seasoned' - that is, stacked and dried for six months or more.

Exotic and native forest pests such as the emerald ash borer and the Asian longhorned beetle are causing serious damage to urban and rural forests in the United States. These pests are dispersed by a variety of means.  Among the most significant is the movement of firewood. Federal and state regulations are in place regarding the movement of firewood, including the Emergency Regulations on Movement of Firewood in Connecticut.
 
A few towns in Connecticut have put into practice urban wood utilization systems that include the processing and distribution of firewood.  In Glastonbury, the town's Department of Parks and Recreation implemented a very efficient waste wood management operation. In 2009 it purchased a 15-inch brush chipper. The chipper allows the town to chip brush at the work site, which eliminates the need to transport piled brush to the bulky waste site. The town uses the wood chips for erosion control and to resurface trails throughout the park system. Wood suitable for sale as cord wood is salvaged, seasoned and split. Glastonbury residents can buy firewood in 1/8 cord lots from the town department. Finding a use for the wood from street and park trees is a more efficient use of personnel's time and also of space at the bulky waste disposal area.  It also reduces fuel consumption and the emission of greenhouse gases.
 
Resources
 
CT Department of Consumer Protection - How to Buy Firewood
 
National Firewood Task Force - Recommendations 
 
The Town of Glastonbury - Wood Reuse (Glastonbury Goes Green, Bulletin 17)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Content last updated August 4, 2014