DEEP: Forestry Articles in CT Wildlife Magazine

Forestry Articles in Connecticut Wildlife Magazine
 
Connecticut Wildlife is a publication of the CT DEEP Bureau of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife.  The following articles from that magazine cover forestry-related topics.
 
by Bureau of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry Staff
Connecticut Wildlife, January/February 2011
Overview: by cutting down sick or deformed trees, Connecticut's state foresters maintain the beauty and health of our state-owned forests. 
 
by Jerry Milne, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, March/April 2011
Overview: the best maple syrup in Connecticut is coming from our very own Paugussett State Forest, home to the largest sugarbush in Connecticut and over 400 taps.
 
by Emery Gluck, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, May/June 2011
Overview: the DEEP Forestry Division is actively burning portions of state lands in order to keep our forests healthy, active and growing.
 
by Chester W. Martin, Field Agent, Commission on Forests and Wild Life
Connecticut Wildlife, July/August 2011
Overview: in the first half of the twentieth century, the Connecticut State Forest program grew from 627 acres to over 100,000 acres over the course of a mere 40 years.
 
by David Irvin, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, September/October 2011
Overview: Because oak trees are important to Connecticut's ecosystems, foresters are doing about everything they can to hold on to these species.
 
by Bianca Beland, Forestry Summer Intern, and Jerry Milne, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, November/December 2011
Overview: what are the benefits of burning Connecticut grown wood as an alternative source of heat for your home?
 
by Jerry Milne, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, January/February 2012
Overview: there are certain simple tricks and tips to making your own maple syrup!
 
by Rachel Holmes, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, May/June 2012
Overview: following the storms of 2011, the trees in the urban forest need our help if the benefits that come from these trees are to be there for future citizens.
 
by Ed McGuire and Daniel Evans, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, May/June 2012
Overview: the "poop" on porcupines and their use of den trees as they survive the winter.
 
by Kathy Kogut, Executive Director, Connecticut Christmas Tree Growers Association
Connecticut Wildlife, November/ December 2012
Overview: a fresh, recently-harvested conifer in the home at Christmas time is a century's old tradition.  In Connecticut, more than 500 tree farms grow Christmas trees, of a variety of species.
 
by Douglas Emmerthal, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, November/December 2013 
Overview: In 2012, the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, CT installed a biomass boiler, allowing it to connect renewable energy, education, wildlife habitat, sustainable forestry and economics together in a unified effort.
 
by Chris Donnelly, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, March/April 2014 
Overview: Tree planting leads the list of what people want to talk about when they talk about urban forestry and community tree programs.  But, who plants these trees?  This article provides some background regarding tree planting programs in Connecticut.
 
by Mary Tyrell, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Connecticut Wildlife, May/June 2014 
Overview: Who owns Connecticut's Woodlands?  An interesting study conducted through the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies helps in the answer of that question, with insights offered in who owns the land and also why.
 
From the Field Update
Connecticut Wildlife, July/August 2014 
Overview: The status of the invasive and destructive insect, the emerald ash borer, as of mid-summer 2014.  At this point, the insect had been found in 38 towns in the state.
 
by Chris Donnelly and Gabriela Doria, DEEP Division of Forestry
Connecticut Wildlife, September/October 2014 
Overview:  It is a fact of life.  Trees in our cities and towns, including treasured trees along our roadways, at some point have to come down.  What happens to these trees when that happens?  This article discusses turning a "waste stream into a value stream" through taking advantage of the opportunity to use the wood in these trees.
 
Content updated December 22, 2014