DEEP: News Releases - 2015
News Releases - 2015
May
5/29/2015State Mosquito Program Begins Mosquito Testing for West Nile and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Viruses
  The State of Connecticut Mosquito Management Program today announced it is monitoring mosquitoes for the presence of viruses that can cause illness in people including West Nile virus (WNV) and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE).
5/29/2015DEEP Announces Winner of 2015 Connecticut Duck Stamp Art Contest
  In an extremely close contest, a panel of judges recently selected wildlife artist Jeffrey Klinefelter’s depiction of three Atlantic brant as the winner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s (DEEP) 2015-16 Connecticut Migratory Bird Conservation (Duck) Stamp Art Contest.
5/28/2015Atlantic Menhaden Kills Reported in Connecticut Estuaries Over Memorial Day Weekend
  Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) is studying potential causes of multiple natural fish kills reported during the past week in coastal waters.
5/27/2015Art Work at the Kellogg Environmental Center
  Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) today announced that artwork by professional graphic designer and local artist, Barbara Rzasa, is on display at the Kellogg Environmental Center in Derby.
5/7/2015Unhealthy Air Quality Forecasted for parts of Connecticut - Friday May 8, 2015
  Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) is forecasting unhealthy air quality for “sensitive groups” Friday, May 8, due to predicted elevated ground-level ozone pollution for Northern Fairfield, Northern New Haven, Litchfield, Hartford and Tolland Counties.
5/4/2015Great Park Pursuit Connecticut State Parks Family Adventure Begins May 9th
  May 9th is a great day to be outdoors with your family – first day of Connecticut’s Great Park Pursuit, Connecticut State Parks Family Adventure and Free Fishing Day across the state
5/4/2015Wild “Orphans:” To Rescue or Not?
  It is normal for many animals to leave their young alone for long periods of time, so your help may not be needed.