CSAO: Employment

Employment/Career Opportunities

The Division of Criminal Justice is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer

Follow this link to learn about current Employment Opportunities/Postings with the Division of Criminal Justice

Follow this link to learn more about Internship Opportunities with the Division of Criminal Justice

There are many reasons to choose a career with the Division of Criminal Justice.

We offer a competitive salary, excellent working conditions and a substantial benefit package, including comprehensive health and dental benefits and an attractive retirement program.

{Patricia M. Froehlich is State} I went to law school only because I wanted to be a prosecutor. To me, it’s not just a job or a career, but a calling, a way of life. Being appointed State’s Attorney is the greatest professional honor I could achieve. I am proud to be a representative of the criminal justice system and to work to uphold the rights of both persons charged with crimes and those who are crime victims.”

PATRICIA M. FROEHLICH

State’s Attorney

Judicial District of Windham
Opportunities abound to grow both personally and professionally – to develop a greater knowledge and understanding of the law and the legal system.

But the guiding force that brings most to the Division of Criminal Justice is a desire to serve the public. First and foremost, we are public servants because our only client is the people of Connecticut. It’s hard work – but it’s rewarding work.

As one prosecutor put it: “I always know that I am on the right side in this job.” Or, put another way, we do make a difference.

Our Appellate Bureau is by far the largest group of attorneys whose practice is limited exclusively to the research and authorship of legal briefs and the presentation of oral arguments before the Connecticut Supreme Court and the Connecticut Appellate Court.

Other specialized units investigate and prosecute corruption in government, white-collar crime, fraud and other high-profile crimes. The State's Attorneys are responsible for the investigation and prosecution of all criminal matters within their respective Judicial District -- matters from motor vehicle infractions to homicide cases.

With some 500 employees – more than half attorneys – the Division of Criminal Justice is essentially one of the largest law firms in the State of Connecticut.

Division of Criminal Justice employees serve in more than 50 locations throughout the state as prosecutors, inspectors, investigators and administrative and support staff. Our alumni include Judges, distinguished members of the private Bar and attorneys involved in public service through other means.

Yes, our only client is the people of Connecticut , and we know that the only way that we can truly serve all of the people is to reflect all of the people – our society as a whole. That is why the Division has such a strong commitment to a diverse workforce.

To learn more about the Division of Criminal Justice, our commitment to diversity in our workforce, and current employment opportunities, please select one of the following links:

Follow this link to learn about Current Employment Opportunities/Postings with the Division of Criminal Justice


About the Division of Criminal Justice


Who We Are

What We Do

A Brief History of Prosecution in Connecticut

Frequently Asked Questions about the Division of Criminal Justice

How Prosecutors Are Appointed in Connecticut

The Application Process

Employee Benefits

Career Path

Professional Development and Training Opportunities

Internships with the Division of Criminal Justice

Employee Advisory Committee on Diversity Issues


It is the continuing policy of the Division of Criminal Justice to afford equal employment opportunity to qualified individuals regardless of their sex, race, creed, disability, or national origin, and to conform to applicable laws and regulations. Equal opportunity encompasses all aspects of employment practices to include, but not limited to, recruiting, hiring, training, compensation, benefits, promotions, transfers, layoffs, discipline, and Division sponsored educational, social, and recreational programs. Additionally, it is the policy of the Division to provide its members a viable means for communication and resolving grievances and complaints regarding unlawful discriminatory employment practices. Any employee of the Division of Criminal Justice who fails to comply with this policy is subject to appropriate disciplinary action.


How Prosecutors Are Appointed in Connecticut

In many states, District Attorneys and other executive level prosecutors are elected and their employees serve at their pleasure – i.e., if the boss isn’t re-elected, you may find yourself out of a job.

{Madison W. Bolden - Inspector - Judicial District of Hartford} "Since I have been associated with the Diversity program, it has given me an opportunity to meet some very nice people, and also to speak to Hartford High School students about getting into Law Enforcement and possibly going on to become an Inspector with the Division of Criminal Justice. It has also encouraged me to speak with minorities about the prospect of joining the Division of Criminal Justice. I have become more sensitive to the needs of others and make all attempts to accommodate their needs."

MADISON W. BOLDEN
Inspector - Judicial District of Hartford

This is not the case in Connecticut. All Connecticut state prosecutors are appointed by the Criminal Justice Commission, an independent commission within the Executive Branch of state government. For more information about the Criminal Justice Commission and its members, follow this link to visit the Commission’s web site.

The Chief State’s Attorney, the Deputy Chief State’s Attorneys and the State’s Attorneys are appointed by the Criminal Justice Commission for a specific term. The length of the term is established by state law. All other prosecutors are hired as permanent employees of the State of Connecticut and can only be terminated for just cause.

Newly appointed prosecutors hold the title of Deputy Assistant State ’s Attorney. Advancement to Assistant State ’s Attorney and Senior Assistant State ’s Attorney is governed by the collective bargaining agreement (union contract) between the State of Connecticut Division of Criminal Justice and the Connecticut Association of Prosecutors, the collective bargaining unit (prosecutors’ union).

The Criminal Justice Commission was established under Article XXIII of the Connecticut Constitution. It consists of six attorneys, two of whom must be Judges of the Superior Court, and the Chief State’s Attorney as an ex-officio member. The Chief State’s Attorney does not participate in the appointment or reappointment process for the Chief State’s Attorney or the Deputy Chief State’s Attorneys.

Non-prosecutor positions in the Division of Criminal Justice are filled through an administrative hiring practice by the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney or the Office of the State’s Attorney for the Judicial District where the position to be filled exists.

“When I attended law school in the 1970s I never imagined myself as a {Lawrence J. Tytla is the Supervisory Assistant State} prosecutor. Working as a judicial clerk, and seeing prosecutors in court daily, demolished the negative stereotype I had previously held. I have had the privilege to spend the last twenty-five years working with some of the most thoughtful, caring, ethical people I have known, people who are aware of the immense power they wield and who exercise it with restraint and compassion. One of the great secrets of the criminal justice system is the degree to which a prosecutor can provide social as well as criminal justice.”

LAWRENCE J. TYTLA
Supervisory Assistant State’s Attorney
Judicial District of New London

The Application Process

All positions for Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney and Juvenile Prosecutor are open to attorneys admitted to the Bar of the State of Connecticut and are advertised in the Connecticut Law Journal and on this Division of Criminal Justice website. Follow this link to view current openings.

All applicants for prosecutor positions are required to submit law school transcripts and a completed State of Connecticut Division of Criminal Justice Employment Application. The application form is available at the Office of the Chief State's Attorney, 300 Corporate Place, Rocky Hill, from any State's Attorney's office or can be downloaded from this site.

Applications are screened by the State’s Attorney for the Judicial District for which the opening exists. If the opening is in one of the bureaus in the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney, applications are screened by the Supervisory Assistant State’s Attorney for that bureau.

The State’s Attorney or the Supervisory Assistant State ’s Attorney will determine which applicants are submitted to the Criminal Justice Commission in the case of candidates for Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney. The Criminal Justice Commission will interview the candidates and has the sole authority to appoint (hire) a Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney.

The appointment of all employees of the Division of Criminal Justice is subject to the completion of a criminal background check. It also should be noted that pursuant to Connecticut state law, prosecutors are prohibited from the private practice of law while employed by the Division of Criminal Justice.

Employee Benefits

  • Competitive salary with annual increases determined by collective bargaining. Prosecutors work a 40-hour work week with flex-time schedules available.
  • Longevity bonuses paid twice annually to employees with more than ten years of service.
  • Fifteen days of paid vacation each year, increasing to twenty days after ten years of service. Employees may accumulate up to 75 days of vacation, the unexpended balance of which is paid to the employee upon retirement.
  • Fifteen days paid sick leave each year (with provisions for Family Sick Leave). Employees may be paid for one-quarter of their sick leave balance on retirement up to maximum of sixty days paid.
  • Twelve paid holidays annually (New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Day, Lincoln’s Birthday, Washington’s Birthday, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans’ Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas)
  • Three personal leave days annually, selected at the employee’s option with the consent of the employer.
  • Health and dental insurance and prescription drug coverage is provided to each employee. At least one health and dental plan is available at no cost to the employee; other plans and family coverage are available at reasonable cost to the employee.
  • Participation in the State Employees Retirement System (pension program).
  • Optional Deferred compensation program.
  • Optional life insurance program available at reasonable rates.
  • Paid training and educational opportunities.
  • Dependent Care Assistance program allows employees to pay child care and other dependent care services on a pre-tax basis.
  • Qualified Transportation Fringe Benefit program allowing employees to pay for employment-related transportation expenses on a pre-tax basis.
  • Domestic Partner benefits.

For details of the benefits provided to employees of the State of Connecticut, follow this link to visit the web site of the Office of the State Comptroller.

Career Path

The Division of Criminal Justice encourages the advancement of all employees to achieve their full potential both for their personal benefit and for the benefit of the State of Connecticut .

Upon appointment by the Criminal Justice Commission, a new prosecutor carries the title of Deputy Assistant State ’s Attorney. Advancement opportunities for prosecutors to the rank of Assistant State ’s Attorney and Senior Assistant State ’s Attorney are governed by provisions of the collective bargaining agreement between the Division of Criminal Justice and the Connecticut Association of Prosecutors.

The appointments of Supervisory Assistant’s Attorneys are made by the Chief State ’s Attorney on the recommendation of the State’s Attorney for the Judicial District in which the position exists, or, in the case of the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney, by the Chief State’s Attorney on the recommendation of the Deputy Chief State ’s Attorney for Operations.

For employees other than prosecutors, the advancement process is governed by the appropriate collective bargaining agreement, or in the case of positions exempted from collective bargaining, by the Chief State ’s Attorney.

Professional Development/Training Opportunities

The Division of Criminal Justice is committed to a comprehensive training program for all employees from the newly hired prosecutor working his or her first day on the job to the most-seasoned veteran of the courtroom. An intensive, two-day training program is held each year in late spring or early summer where prosecutors from throughout the State gather for educational sessions and networking opportunities. The Division also provides a wide range of “in-house” training opportunities at other times during the year where educational programs are presented by current Division employees with specific expertise in the subject area or by guest lecturers. Additionally, the Division participates in many other training programs offered by other government agencies and private organizations.

Internships with the Division of Criminal Justice

The Division of Criminal Justice offers an internship program to acquaint law students with Connecticut’s criminal justice system, in particular the role of the prosecutor. The internship program is an important component of the Division of Criminal Justice Affirmative Action initiative and outreach to the community.

An intern may be placed in a Bureau in the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney in Rocky Hill or in any of the approximately fifty Division of Criminal Justice offices around the state -- preferably close to the student’s residence. Subject to interest and availability, intern field trips may be scheduled to the Connecticut State Police Forensic Laboratory, a correctional facility, and the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

Basic Requirements for an Internship:

  • The applicant must have completed one full year at an American Bar Association-accredited law school and must be in good standing academically.
  • All students applying for an internship are subject to a background check.
  • A summer intern must commit to a minimum of three days a week for six weeks.
  • Students who are doing a for-credit internship during the academic year must comply with their law schools’ requirements for academic credit and be supervised by a law professor and a prosecutor.
  • Interns must maintain strict confidentiality about the contents of the prosecutors’ files and about cases they hear discussed in the prosecutors’ offices.
  • Interns at all times must dress appropriately, act professionally and show respect for crime victims, witnesses, court personnel, office staff, defendants and their attorneys.
  • Students who wish to appear in court must meet the requirements of Practice Book Section 3-14, et. seq. (Follow this link to read the applicable Practice Book sections - PDF File - Size 36KB - Adobe Acrobat Reader Required. The free Acrobat Reader can be downloaded from www.adobe.com)
An Intern's Duties

Depending on a student’s aptitude, level of legal education, and designated office, and in compliance with Connecticut Practice Book Rules, the following experiences are available under the supervision of a prosecutor: calling the docket, handling arraignments, preparing and arguing bond motions, performing legal research, writing memos, attending pre-trial conferences and plea negotiations, assisting at jury selection, meeting with witnesses and victims.

How To Apply

Interested law students must sumbit a letter of interest with an updated resume and their most recent academic transcript by email to DCJ.internship@ct.gov or by U.S. Mail to:

Office of the Chief State's Attorney
Attn: Equal Employment Opportunities Specialist Ngina Gibson
300 Corporate Place
Rocky Hill, CT 06067

For More Information

Employee Advisory Committee on Diversity Issues

The Employee Advisory Committee on Diversity Issues was established to address issues of diversity for Division of Criminal Justice employees, and to assist in the development and implementation of the Division’s Affirmative Action Plan.

The Committee, which meets on a quarterly basis, is composed of twenty employees who represent a cross section of occupations within the Division of Criminal Justice.

Participation in this committee is open to all Division of Criminal Justice employees. The duty of the Committee is to recommend and assist the Affirmative Action Officer in support of promoting affirmative action throughout the Division.

QUESTIONS? Follow this link to e-mail the Division of Criminal Justice.



Content Last Modified on 4/29/2013 11:59:27 AM